Thursday, October 19, 2017

AZMEX UPDATE 19-10-17

AZMEX UPDATE 19 OCT 2017

Note: Close to home. From the good folks at Borderland Beat http://www.borderlandbeat.com
thx

Sinaloa Cartel cell responsible for recent murder of journalist
Posted by Stevectpa-Republished from El Universal translated by Mexico Daily

http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2017/10/sinaloa-cartel-cell-responsible-for.html#more

The murder last March in Chihuahua of journalist Miroslava Breach Velducea, 54, has been linked to hired gunmen associated with the Sinaloa Cartel, the state Attorney General's office revealed this week.

The investigation has found that one of the four hitmen who killed Breach on March 23 is the nephew of Crispín Salazar, leader of a regional gang known as Los Salazar.

Thought to be a cell of the Sinaloa Cartel, the gang is based in and operates from the remote mountain Chihuahua municipality of Chínipas, close to the border with Sonora and also Breach's hometown.

Sources quoted by the Attorney General said Breach's murder was revenge by Los Salazar, who felt betrayed by the journalist's exposés on their modus operandi.

"What we know is that Los Salazar were not pleased with her, not so much about the content of her stories, but because they were being singled out by someone from their own hometown . . . shining the light on the abuses they committed and the way they attempted to impose candidates during the most recent [state] elections," said Attorney General César Augusto Peniche Espejel.


Los Salazar operate in the border region between Chihuahua and Sonora, cultivating and trafficking marijuana and opium poppies, which they smuggle into the United States across the border between Sonora and Arizona.


Arrest warrants have been issued for the four individuals suspected in Breach's murder.

Rosa María Breach, the victim's sister, recently won an amparo, or injunction, in which a federal judge ordered that the state provide her with all information it had gathered regarding the journalist's murder.

The Attorney General had refused to release the information on the grounds that Rosa María Breach was a third party, and that only the journalist's children could be granted access to the case file.

Note:
The Salazars operate in Sonora and in the mountains of Chihuahua. They control the planting, production and transfer of drugs to Arizona, in addition to the trafficking of undocumented migrants. Their founder, Adamo Salaar Zamorano, was an lieutenant of Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán.
Borderland Beat Reporter guest reporter Posted at 10:09 AM

END


Border gunbattles leave 11 dead in northern Mexico
Updated 3:58 pm, Tuesday, October 17, 2017

http://www.lmtonline.com/news/texas/article/Border-gunbattles-leave-11-dead-in-northern-Mexico-12282868.php?utm_campaign=hpborder

FILE - A Mexican federal police officer mans an automatic weapon during a patrol in Reynosa, where drug cartels battle each other for dominance over trade routes to the U.S. Officials said shootouts in the border city of Reynosa and around towns in the northern Mexico border state of Tamaulipas have caused at least 11 deaths. Photo: Billy Calzada, Staff / San Antonio Express-News / San Antonio Express-News
Photo: Billy Calzada, Staff / San Antonio Express-News

CIUDAD VICTORIA, Mexico (AP) — A running series of gunbattles caused at least 11 deaths in the northern Mexico border state of Tamauilpas, authorities said Monday.

Officials said the shootouts in the border city of Reynosa and the nearby town of Rio Bravo started late Sunday. Gunmen hijacked vehicles and used them to block streets, and spread bent nails to puncture tires to facilitate their getaways. Authorities called in a helicopter to support ground patrols moving to break up the roadblocks.
One group of four gunmen was killed near a gas station after they opened fire on a military patrol, officials said. Three other bodies were discovered at other points around Rio Bravo.


Police found 13 improvised armored vehicles, which are usually light trucks with welded steel plating. Such vehicles are often used by drug gangs in Tamaulipas. Officers also found six hand grenades, 17 40-mm rifle-launched grenades and about three dozen guns, including a .50-caliber sniper rifle.


The dead included a man apparently killed by assailants after he and a child sought shelter from gunfire in a house on their way to school. The man and child emerged from the house when the shooting died down temporarily, and that is when the man was hit.
Three people also were killed in what appeared to be targeted shootings in the town of Padilla, farther south.
Reynosa is across the border from McAllen, Texas, and has been the scene of turf battles between factions of the Gulf cartel.
In Chihuahua, another northern border state, prosecutors said Monday that the death toll from a shootout in the remote mountain town of Uruachi had risen to seven. About 100 state police officers were sent to the town after the Friday gunfight, which apparently involved a dispute between rival gunmen.

end

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

AZMEX F&F EXTRA 17-10-17

AZMEX F&F EXTRA 17 OCT 2017

Note: The Obama regime's "Fast & Furious" - Mexican Lives didn't Matter.
Neither did law enforcement lives.
Thx



Authorities make final arrest in death of Border Patrol agent in Arizona
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
OCTOBER 17, 2017 AT 3:33 AM

http://ktar.com/story/1788977/authorities-make-final-arrest-in-death-of-border-patrol-agent-in-arizona/

Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry (AP Photo)

PHOENIX — Authorities in Mexico have arrested the final of seven defendants accused in the killing of a U.S. Border Patrol agent whose death exposed a bungled federal gun operation, the U.S. Attorney's Office said.

Jesus Rosario Favela-Astorga was arrested Saturday without incident and faces first-degree murder and other charges in the December 2010 killing of 40-year-old Brian Terry in Arizona.

The 37-year-old is the last of the defendants in the case, including five men who have either pleaded guilty or been found guilty in federal court in Tucson.

Another suspect, Heraclio Osorio-Arellanes, was arrested in Mexico in April, but a judge has yet to approve his extradition to the U.S.

Favela-Astorga was a member of a crew that planned on robbing marijuana smugglers when it encountered Terry and other agents who were on a stakeout in the southern Arizona desert, authorities said.

The killing unveiled the Fast and Furious operation, in which federal agents allowed criminals to buy guns with the intention of tracking them to criminal organizations.

But the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives lost most of the guns, including two that were found at scene of Terry's death.

The operation set off political backlash against the Obama administration and led the agent's family to sue.

Terry was in an elite Border Patrol unit staking out the southern Arizona desert for "rip-off" crew members who rob drug smugglers.

The four-man team encountered a group and identified themselves as police in trying to arrest them.

But authorities say the men refused to stop, prompting an agent to fire non-lethal bean bags at them. They responded by firing from AK-47-type assault rifles. Terry was struck in the back and died shortly afterward.

Among those already serving time are Manual Osorio-Arellanes, who pleaded guilty to murder and was sentenced to 30 years in prison in 2014, and Jesus Leonel Sanchez-Meza and Ivan Soto-Barraza, who were found guilty of murder and other charges in 2015.

A man who was not present during the shooting but is charged with assembling the rip-off crew, Rosario Rafael Burboa-Alvarez, also pleaded guilty to murder.

Rito Osorio-Arellanes, who was not at the shooting, has pleaded guilty to conspiracy to interfere with commerce by robbery.

end

Monday, October 16, 2017

AZMEX EXTRA 15-10-17

AZMEX EXTRA 15 OCT 2017

Note: photos at link.

Arms, drugs and money seized by Sedena (Mexican Army)
Details Posted on Saturday October 14, 2017,
Written by Marco A. Flores
http://www.eldiariodesonora.com.mx/notas.php?nota=98945

Nogales, Son

Drugs, armaments and large sums of cash were confiscated in several municipalities, including Sonoyta and El Sáric, Sonora, in recent hours by the National Defense Secretariat (Sedena) through its military base in Nogales.

According to an official report from the 45th Military Zone based in Nogales, seizures were made in the last 48 hours, in Baja California and Sonora, where military personnel in cooperation with authorities of the three levels of government, arrested 11 people in criminal flagrante delicto

Six kilos of methamphetamine, two packets of marijuana, 12 long guns, four handguns, 608 cartridges of different calibers, 18 magazines of different calibers and 52 wrappers (doses) of cristal were also secured.

In addition, the seizure of nine vehicles, a tractor trailer, as well as five thousand 920 dollars and 656 thousand 250 pesos, as well as diverse tactical equipment, were reported.

The report adds that these events were carried out in Tijuana and San Felipe, B.C., as well as in Opodepe, corresponding to the municipality of Hermosillo, San Emeterio, Sonoyta municipality and El Sáric, municipality of Caborca, Sonora.

In view of the foregoing, military personnel in coordination with the aforementioned civil authorities, who, as first responders, proceeded to transfer detainees, drugs, weapons and vehicles to the premises of the P.G.R. of the different municipalities, to make them available to the corresponding Federal Public Prosecutors.

Photo gallery

end

AZMEX DOPER SPECIAL 15-10-17

AZMEX DOPER SPECIAL 15 OCT 2017

Note: Video, etc. at links. Seems to be very little media interest in this one.
Comment: Are we sure he is not really a Russian? After all, Mexico's participation during the US election seen to have escaped notice. If dopers are locked up, they can't steal your stuff. Or do we and Mexico need even more thieving doper parasites?
thx



Ex-Mexican President in Phoenix promoting pot legalization
Posted: Oct 14, 2017 5:54 PM MST
Updated: Oct 14, 2017 7:18 PM MST
By Carissa PlanalpCONNECT
Ex-Mexican President in Phoenix promoting pot legalization

http://www.azfamily.com/story/36598836/ex-mexican-pres-in-phoenix-promoting-pot-legalization?autostart=true

PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -
Former Mexican President Vicente Fox spoke Saturday at the Southwest Cannabis Conference and Expo in downtown Phoenix where he hit on topics including legalizing weed, NAFTA negotiations and the fate of those protected under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).

"You need to start by putting the issue to public debate," Fox said as he described changing attitudes toward pot use.

Mexico just legalized medical marijuana. Fox claims more than 60 percent of Mexicans support taking the movement further to allow recreational use which, he believes, will eliminate the black market and boost economies.

Fox soon jumped to the topic of NAFTA as the United States tries to negotiate new trade terms with Mexico. If demands are not met, President Donald Trump has said he's willing to leave the negotiating table in favor of an agreement solely with Canada.

One proposal seeks to increase the number of American-made car parts.

"If Sr Trump is so stubborn and forces GM, and Chrysler and Ford to come back and manufacture in the United States, you'd have to read history," says Fox who insists car companies would go bankrupt and need taxpayer bailouts.

Now that the deadline for DACA recipients to apply for renewals has now passed, the fate of those brought here illegally as children is uncertain. Fox said "doors are open in Mexico," insisting the country would welcome them home where they could find job opportunities.

"I understand that you want to stay here and be sure you're going to win this battle. You are right, the other guy is wrong," said Fox.

President Trump has said the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals is unconstitutional. He's now looking to Congress to find a solution. There are about 28,000 people in Arizona protected from deportation under DACA terms.

end

More:

http://www.fox10phoenix.com/news/arizona-news/3rd-annual-southwest-cannabis-conference-and-expo-comes-to-phoenix

Friday, October 13, 2017

AZMEX UPDATE 13-10-17

AZMEX UPDATE 13 OCT 2017


Seven migrants rescued in Arizona desert
Details Posted on Thursday October 12, 2017,
Written by Marco A. Flores
http://www.eldiariodesonora.com.mx/notas.php?nota=98818

Nogales, Az

Thanks to the activation of an emergency beacon and a call to the 9-1-1 emergency number, a total of seven migrants were rescued in the last hours by Border Patrol agents and Maritime and Air Operations agents, who responded to the call.

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) released a report on the recovery of undocumented migrants in the desert area of ​​western Arizona.

In a first case, agents assigned to the Ajo Station, they got a call to 9-1-1 of a man who explained that, along with three other subjects, they had crossed the line days before and that they had run out of water.

A helicopter assisted in locating the group and after determining that they did not require medical assistance, they were taken to the station for processing.

In the second call, agents from the Casa Grande Station responded to the activation of an emergency beacon in the Tohono O'odham Reservation, where they found three Mexican migrants, who also did not require medical checkups.

They surprise "burreros"
Meanwhile, Border Patrol agents in the Yuma Sector arrested nine undocumented migrants carrying more than 400 pounds of marijuana, a cargo valued at about $ 208,000.

The "burreros" group was detected in the desert area west of Gila Bend, where officers followed the tracks north of the border line and overtook the traffickers, who carried several packages on their backs.

END


N4T Investigators: Border Patrol arrests gang members in southern Arizona
Posted: Oct 12, 2017 4:08 PM MST
Updated: Oct 12, 2017 11:03 PM MST
Written By Paul Birmingham
Written By John Overall
http://www.kvoa.com/story/36586170/n4t-investigators-border-patrol-arrests-gang-members-in-southern-arizona

The Tucson sector of the Border Patrol is ground zero in the fight against illegal immigration. As the News 4 Tucson Investigators discovered, some of those illegal crossers have already had multiple encounters with the U.S. justice system. That's because they're dangerous gang members.

The most recent gang members busted in southern Arizona were taken into custody by Border Patrol agents just a few days ago. Authorities say both men were known to law enforcement here in the United States, and both men had previously been deported.

"We identify everyone who illegally attempts to come across into the United States when we make the arrest. We identify if they have criminal history, and we identify if they have any affiliation to gangs," Border Patrol Agent Christopher Sullivan told the News 4 Tucson Investigators.

Agent Sullivan added that the Border Patrol is always on the lookout for people who are intent on criminal activity. That includes members of MS-13, a criminal gang that originally formed in Los Angeles.

"Here in the Tucson Sector, we have come in contact with MS-13 members attempting to illegally enter the United States," Sullivan told the News 4 Tucson Investigators.

In fact, just last month agents in the Tucson Sector arrested two other previously deported MS-13 gang members. Again, both of those men have extensive criminal histories.

"Often times, you know, gang members have gang-affiliated tattoos that identify them. Some admit to being gang members," Agent Sullivan told the News 4 Tucson Investigators.

"Tucson isn't a destination city. It's kind of a corridor city. They're on their way somewhere else," said Captain Sean Stewart, the head of security at the Pima County Adult Detention Center.

Captain Stewart is familiar with most of the criminal gangs operating in southern Arizona. He told the News 4 Tucson Investigators, while many people focus on MS-13, there are other gangs that are already well-established and operating in our state.

"So, if an MS-13 individual tried to set-up shop in one of these neighborhoods, they'd be run out," Captain Stewart said.

Captain Stewart also told the News 4 Tucson Investigators, all inmates who have gang affiliations are put on notice just as soon as they're booked into jail.

"Our security staff will sit down and talk with them - we recognize your tattoos, we know who you are, we know what you're about. Don't cause us problems, because we're watching," Captain Stewart said.

Captain Stewart also told the News 4 Tucson Investigators, it's critical that jail security keep close watch over every inmate who is locked up. That includes monitoring their phone calls.

"It's a chess game. It's not a game, but you're playing mental chess with somebody. They're trying to get drugs and cellphones into your prison system, and you're trying to stop them," Captain Stewart told the News 4 Tucson Investigators.

Trying to stop the gang members from ever stepping foot in the U.S. in the first place is the primary job of the agents working on the front lines of illegal immigration in southern Arizona.

"We want to prevent that from happening, whether that be arresting them here in Tucson, while they're transitioning to their intended destination, and stop them from coming across the border," Agent Sullivan told the News 4 Tucson Investigators.

Click here for the most recent information on the number of arrests of individuals with criminal convictions.
https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/cbp-enforcement-statistics/criminal-alien-statistics

end

AZMEX I3 8-10-17

AZMEX I3 8 OCT 2017

Comment: No, did not make this up. Unknown at this time as to why the rest of the family didn't return to Mexico with him.
A informal study shows far less stress if a immigrant enters the country legally. Far less likely to be deported.
thx




DEATH OF A WOULD-BE DREAMER
Did Frankie Madrid have to die?
MAX LANCASTER Sun Staff Reporter 6 hrs ago

http://azdailysun.com/news/did-frankie-madrid-have-to-die/article_96b0a7ea-51da-587e-a5f1-20aa483ef170.html#tncms-source=home-featured

Frankie Madrid, center in pink pants, speaks at an immigration rally outside Flagstaff City Hall in April 2014.
Eva Putzova / Facebook

An undocumented community activist, convicted drug felon and longtime Flagstaff resident has taken his own life less than two months after being deported to Mexico.

Francisco "Frankie" Madrid-Holguin died by suicide in Hermosillo, Mexico on Monday, according to his lawyer Lee Phillips.

Madrid, who lived undocumented in Flagstaff since he was 4-months old, was deported in August after serving a total of 1.5 years in detention and prison for heroin possession.
Flagstaff Police arrested him in January 2016
for possession of narcotic drugs for sale,
possession of drug paraphernalia and
carrying a weapon in the commission of a felony crime.

Madrid was in possession of 20 grams of heroin at the time of his arrest and was transferred to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. He pleaded guilty to possession of a dangerous drug in March 2017.

Some community leaders were deeply saddened over the loss of a committed activist for LGBQT and immigration rights, as well as his involvement with organizations such as the Northern Arizona Interfaith Council and the Sunnyside I AM Youth Group.

"I woke up this morning to a message sent to me late last night that Frankie took his life," Putzova said. "I feel incredibly sad because his death could have been prevented. The cruel immigration laws of this country killed him. I can't imagine being sent to an exile to a foreign country I have no connections to without the ability to see my family ever again. The cruelty of his situation is incomprehensible to most of us."

Others, such as former city Councilman Jeff Oravits, expressed sympathy over those affected by the opioid epidemic, but said "We are a nation with immigration laws and drugs laws," and that undocumented individuals who break the law have to face consequences.
He also stated that if the country wants to give leniency to individuals such as Madrid then citizens should work to change the law.

Putzova disagreed, saying that Madrid's immigration status and legal troubles should have been separate issues. "Frankie got into legal trouble but paid his debt to society. America was made whole," Putzova said. "He was rehabilitated by serving his 1.5-year sentence. His trouble with criminal law should be a completely separate issue from his undocumented status under the immigration law. In what meaningful way was he different than any other citizen, naturalized or US-born that he deserved to be exiled?"

Putzova's GoFundMe page for Madrid's legal defense did not mention his drug arrest, a point of contention for her critics.

"If you come to this country illegally and you commit a felony you shouldn't be welcome," said local political activist Rob Wilson. Wilson added that individuals like Madrid, who have lived in the United States their entire life, should be even more cautious about committing a felony. "They are more aware than anyone about the risk," Wilson said. "The deterrents should be even greater in their case."

But Flagstaff Mayor Coral Evans also expressed frustration at the system that deported Madrid.
"We don't often talk about the mental and emotional toll it takes on people when their immigration status is vulnerable and being taken away, or the stress and challenge of trying to take care of a family when you don't have legal status," Evans said. "My heart breaks, not just for Frankie and his family, but for all Dreamers whose lives are being held in limbo."

DISTRSSED AND DEPRESSED

Madrid, who had been living with distant relatives in Mexico, was becoming increasingly anxious and depressed at the thought of never seeing his family, according to Phillips, who spoke to Madrid days before his suicide.

"He seemed to be distressed and depressed over the thought that at 25-years old he would never see his family or go back home again," Phillips said. "He started saying that he couldn't see a future alone in Mexico."

Madrid was also upset over his mother's hospitalization due to heart troubles, according to Phillips.

Madrid lost his work visa in 2014 after his immigration attorney failed to file his application for the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program. He then could no longer legally drive and was unable to support his family while his brother, Norberto "Beto" Ramos-Madrid, faced trial for the murder of Juan Hernandez. Madrid's brother was found not guilty in 2015, but by then Madrid had become addicted to heroin.

Frankie Madrid, back left, campaigns for current Flagstaff City Council member Eva Putzova, front left.
Courtesy of Eva Putzova

Madrid's friend, Mary Black, said the culmination of his addiction and deportation led him to suicide.
"His sensitive heart and soul had been through so much," Black wrote on social media. "He tried and had one bad luck thing after another. He just wanted to come home to Flagstaff and be with his family, friends and daughter."

Phillips said that taking away Madrid's ability to work pushed him to start using heroin, which got him arrested and then deported. "People without legal status are in the worst possible situation," Phillips said. "We force them into these situations where they do things they wouldn't normally do, like shoplifting and drugs. We take away their chance to raise up and then punish them for it."

Evans described Madrid as "one of my kids," who she knew since he was 9 years old and said she was "heartbroken over the loss of such a beautiful life."

Phillips said he and his family had grown close with Madrid and they would all miss having dinners and long talks with him.

Phillips wished he could have done more to stop Madrid's deportation, but conceded that the circumstances were dire because of Madrid's drug offense. "In theory we could have stopped his deportation, but it would have been extremely unlikely," Phillips said. "When you are dealing with drug charges it is very unlikely."

Phillips went on to say that Madrid was a good person despite his legal troubles.
"He was a sweet and happy soul who just couldn't handle what life threw at him."

Family and friends will plan a memorial service for Madrid once his remains are brought back to the U.S.

end


Max Lancaster is the crime and courts reporter for the Arizona Daily Sun. He enjoys all things music and just learned how Kombucha is made.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

AZMEX UPDATE 10-10-17

AZMEX UPDATE 10 OCT 2017


Note: "but released from Pima County Jail without a bond." Photo at link.

WANTED: AZ Drug Trafficker on the Run
For Immediate Release: October 10, 2017
Contact: Mia Garcia (602) 339-5895 or Mia.Garcia@azag.gov

https://www.azag.gov/press-release/wanted-az-drug-trafficker-run-0
Jury Found Him Guilty of Transporting 70 Pounds of Cocaine

SOUTHERN ARIZONA - Attorney General Mark Brnovich is warning the public to be on the lookout for a convicted drug trafficker who is currently on the run.
A jury found Mario Sergio Dorame guilty of transporting more than 70 pounds of cocaine, as well as conducting a criminal enterprise and conspiracy.
Dorame absconded during trial. To date, law enforcement efforts to find Dorame have been unsuccessful.
A warrant has been issued for his arrest.

Dorame was driving his truck west on Interstate 10 in Pima County when he was pulled over for a traffic violation in November 2016.
An Arizona Department of Public Safety Trooper found more than 70 pounds of cocaine in a hidden compartment in Dorame's truck.

Dorame was arrested that day, but released from Pima County Jail without a bond.
Although Dorame showed up for pre-trial hearings, he absconded just before a jury trial started in September 2017.

This is not the first time Dorame transported drugs in Arizona.
In July 2012, Dorame was arrested for transporting 279 pounds of marijuana in his vehicle.
He pleaded guilty in federal court and was sentenced to a short prison term.
Additionally, in 2010, he was found guilty of Theft of Means of Transportation in Cochise County, AZ.

Assistant Attorney General Jordan Emerson prosecuted this matter.

Anyone with information on Dorame's whereabouts should immediately call their local law enforcement agency.

end


Another link.
http://www.kgun9.com/news/local-news/ag-warns-of-drug-trafficking-fugitive

end

Monday, October 9, 2017

AZMEX POLICY 8-10-17

AZMEX POLICY 8 OCT 2017


Landowner rights at center of challenge to border wall
Proposal would bar use of eminent domain for border barrier
LORENZO ZAZUETA-CASTRO | STAFF WRITER Follow @lorenzozazueta 20 hrs ago

http://www.themonitor.com/news/immigration/article_9b3a41fa-abc2-11e7-b937-17e5bc2e8e22.html

In this Sept. 6, 2012, photo, cotton farmer Teofilo "Junior" Flores stands on one side of the U.S.-Mexico border fence that passes across his property in Brownsville, Texas. Since 2008, hundreds of landowners on the border have sought fair prices for property that was condemned to make way for the fence, but many of them received initial offers that were far below market value. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Eric Gay
In response to President Donald Trump's administration continuing efforts to make good on his polarizing campaign promise of constructing new border walls on the U.S. Mexico border, U.S. Reps. Beto O'Rourke, D-El Paso, and Ruben Gallego, D-Ariz., announced new legislation designed to prevent the federal government from usurping private land to do so.

During a news conference earlier in the week, O'Rourke and Gallego discussed how the legislation — The Protecting the Property Rights of Border Landowners Act — would amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to forbid the Secretary of Homeland Security and the U.S. Attorney General from using eminent domain to acquire land for construction of new border walls, or any other barrier along the U.S. Mexico border.

"We do not need a 2,000-mile, 30-foot-high wall separating us from Mexico," O'Rourke said during the call. "And if the Trump administration moves forward with the construction of this wall, it will be built not on the international boundary line but in the U.S. — much of it on private property in the state of Texas."

In July, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security stated that the Army Corps of Engineers had begun preparations for the construction of a wall in several places along the border, including El Paso.

Additionally, the president requested funding to double the number of Department of Justice attorneys who work in land acquisition. And construction on eight prototypes for the wall began last week with Trump saying he would pick the design himself.

All this has occurred while nearly 100 eminent domain condemnation cases remain open from more than a decade ago — the last time the government seized land for a wall in the Rio Grande Valley, including in Los Ebanos, where Efren Olivares of the Texas Civil Rights Project worked extensively.

A dry corn field stretches across the land toward the U.S. border fence along Old Military Highway in San Benito as the U.S. Attorney's Office seeks to settle remainging landowner cases.
AP

While working with the private landowners, Olivares said he saw firsthand what he characterized as abuse on behalf of the federal government.

" For almost 10 years, we at Texas Civil Rights Project have seen how the federal government abused the eminent domain process and violated the rights of landowners in the Texas borderlands in the process to build the existing border fence," Olivares said. "People were paid cents on the dollar for their land, almost in all cases without proper consultation processes and with confusing or incomplete information, at best. We are glad to see this bill introduced as a way to ensure that people in border communities are not railroaded again in the government's obstinate pursuit of a border wall."

O'Rourke visited the Valley in late July and toured the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, one of the region's several locations the administration has picked for border wall construction.

That same month, O'Rourke and Gallego opposed the inclusion of $1.6 billion to start building Trump's border wall.

At Wednesday's conference, O'Rourke said the administration — in planning the construction of these barriers — has neglected the rights of property owners who live in, and around the border. O'Rourke also noted that two-thirds of the land along the border is private or state-owned, most of which falling within Texas.

The idea of Texan private landowners going up against the federal government is nothing new.

More than four years ago, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management claimed that sections of a 116-mile stretch of land along the Red River belonged to the federal government. Officials with BLM cited a 1923 Supreme Court decision as the basis for their claim, saying that the court assigned land north of the river to Oklahoma and the territory south of the river to Texas. The patches in between belong to the federal government.

But private landowners, farmers and ranchers who have paid taxes on the land in dispute say the property is actually theirs.

Asked about similarities with the Red River issue, and the federal government's attempt to use eminent domain to strip landowners of their private property, Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, focused instead on his three-prong approach to border security.

Cornyn worked with U.S. Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, on the issue

Along with two other Republican senators, Cornyn — who worked with U.S. Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, on the Red River issue — introduced legislation on Wednesday that would increase resources along the border, as well as boost trade through ports of entry and strengthen enforcement of existing laws,

"I believe any border security solution should contain a combination of three things: physical and tactical infrastructure, personnel and technology," Cornyn said. "How those combinations of three things work will vary at different locations along the border, because each mile is unique and presents a different challenge in terms of what's needed."

Just last month, DHS's Office of Immigration Statistics released a report that stated 55 to 85 percent of attempted illegal crossings were unsuccessful. This is up from just over a decade ago when that percentage was in the 35 to 70 percent range, the document states.

"We do not need a border wall that raids the land of private citizens, ransacks the businesses and ranches of hard-working Texans and strips property rights away from Americans," O'Rourke said.

END


BUTTERFLIES? Don't miss this one.
https://www.texasobserver.org/border-wall-lawsuit-butterfly-center-trump/

end

AZMEX UPDATE 8-10-17

AZMEX UPDATE 8 OCT 2017

Note: Local interest mostly.

New U.S. consul says cross-border exchanges are a top priority
By Kendal Blust
Nogales International Oct 6, 2017 (0)

http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/new-u-s-consul-says-cross-border-exchanges-are-a/article_782dd36c-aa22-11e7-9585-fb1f02a48c70.html

Virginia Staab took the helm at the U.S. Consulate in Nogales, Sonora in August.
Photo by Kendal Blust

Two months into her post in Nogales, Sonora, the U.S. government's top representative in northern Sonora said she's ready to tackle priorities ranging from facilitating cross-border cultural exchange and economic opportunities, to improving the daily lives of people on both sides of what she called an "amazingly impressive" community.

"I have three years here, but it passes really fast, quite honestly, so I'm anxious to get going," U.S. Consul General Virginia Staab said Tuesday, noting that as she works to strengthen relationships between the United States and Mexico during that three-year assignment, one of her most important jobs is to listen.

"The basis of our job is to get out and talk to people, all kinds of people," she said. That includes students, government leaders, business owners and mothers, who know the most pressing issues in the communities where she works.

"There's no substitute for hearing it from the people who live here's mouths," she said.

Staab, who took the helm at the U.S. Consulate in Nogales, Sonora, at the beginning of August, joined the foreign service 15 years ago, she said, after the trauma of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 pushed her to do "something a little bit more soul enriching."

So in 2003, she left her job at a law firm in San Francisco and accepted a post in Bogota, Colombia, where she was stationed until 2006. While there, Staab met her husband, a fellow diplomat, and the couple has since been stationed with their two children, a 10-year-old daughter and 5-year-old son, at various posts in Europe and Latin America.

Most recently, Staab served as the director of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement in Guatemala, which she enjoyed enough to offer to extend her stay for an extra year – unless she was assigned to the post in Nogales, Sonora, she said.

"It felt like winning the lottery," she said of the assignment to Nogales. "It was my very first choice … and we're just extremely happy to be here, my family and I."

Immigration concerns

As she gets her feet under her in her new role, Staab said, she has spent much of her time visiting communities throughout the Nogales consular district to better understand the Arizona-Sonora border region.

"Certainly there is a lot of nervousness and trepidation about especially the Dreamers and things like that," she said, noting that visas and the U.S. immigration system are foremost in the minds of many people she talks to.

As for concerns about the fate of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients, who were left dangling after President Trump announced the coming end of the Obama-era protections for young immigrants last month, "that conversation is ongoing," she said, calling much of what people hear about U.S. policy "a window into an internal dialogue" that has not yet been resolved.

In part, Staab's role as a consul is deciphering for others the way the U.S. government works and "to explain, what does it mean when the pres. says X or Y? How does it all work?" she said. "It's not over when any one group says it's over. It's still ongoing."

On the issue of immigration, Staab said she's hopeful that there will be an "equitable resolution," adding that while there is disagreement on what comprehensive immigration reform should look like, it is widely accepted that change is needed.

"As the president says, we've never had a closer friend than Mexico, and that will continue," she said, noting that in matters of trade, the economy and immigration, it is important to maintain and strengthen the connections between the two countries, a fact that is especially apparent in border communities.

Crossing borders

To that end, facilitating speedier and more streamlined border crossings is one of her priorities, Staab said, calling crossing the border a "monumental task" for people on both sides.

"So one of our first efforts is working with local government and local entities to improve Mariposa (Port of Entry)," she said. "It's such an amazing facility. It's huge, it has such potential, and (we want to use it) to the fullest of its potential, because that will increase commerce."

While security cannot be compromised, Staab added, she wants to bring all the players to the table to find solutions that reduce redundancy, increase traffic flow and draw more economic opportunities to area, which she said is widely seen as a top interest for the United States. She pointed to the ongoing process to build a new, larger consulate in Nogales, Sonora, which will be twice as large in both size and staff when it's completed in about two years, as evidence of Nogales' prominence.

"It's an extremely important area. The amount of immigration and transportation and business and exchanges, the amount that goes on here is just incredible," she said. "And we want to broadcast what it's really like."

end

Friday, October 6, 2017

AZMEX I3 1=6-10-17

AZMEX I3 6 OCT 2017


Note: Time for a wall along the Colorado River?


California to become a 'sanctuary state' in 2018
BY TARYN LUNA
tluna@sacbee.com
OCTOBER 05, 2017 11:01 AM

http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article177212866.html

Gov. Jerry Brown placed new limitations on state and local law enforcement's ability to help the federal government enforce immigration violations by signing California's controversial "sanctuary state" bill into law on Thursday.

Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León introduced Senate Bill 54 weeks after the 2016 election to stifle President Donald Trump's campaign pledge to ramp up deportations and prevent the federal government from using California police officers to accomplish his goal.

SB 54 was among nearly a dozen immigration-related bills that Brown signed on Thursday. Others prohibit landlords from reporting their undocumented renters, bar employers from authorizing workplace raids by federal immigration enforcement officials, and allow students whose parents are deported to continue attending California schools.

The measure, a hallmark of the state's so-called "resistance" to the White House, became a deeply controversial topic and prompted U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to campaign against it alongside the California State Sheriffs' Association.

After publicly questioning the legislation, Brown intervened and demanded a 12-fold increase in the types of prior convictions that exclude immigrants from most protections under the bill – from 65 different serious and violent felonies to over 800 crimes, including some misdemeanors. Brown's amendments also gave federal immigration agents access to interview immigrants in jails and exempted the California Department of Corrections from the measure, among other major changes.

In a signing statement, Brown noted the changes he demanded. "These are uncertain times for undocumented citizens and their families, and this bill strikes a balance that will protect public safety, while bringing a measure of comfort to those families who are now living in fear every day," Brown said.

Before the amendments were revealed to the public, some advocates for the undocumented community complained that the changes drastically weakened the bill. In the end, the groups applauded the measure as a positive step forward.

De León defended the final version of the bill, saying it still accomplished his initial objective to prevent California resources and police from being "commandeered" for Trump's policies.

"California's local law enforcement cannot be commandeered and used by the Trump Administration to tear families apart, undermine our safety, and wreak havoc on our economy," de Leon said at a news conference in Los Angeles, where activists behind him chanted "Sí, se puede."

De León denounced Trump and criticized his policies as "racist and xenophobic."

"I know Trump supporters don't get this from their news outlets or blogs, but immigrants commit far fewer crimes than U.S.-born citizens. That is a fact, not fake news," he said.

Former Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, a San Francisco politician who carried an anti-deportation California law known as the Trust Act, said advocates got "sucker punched" and acquiesced to make the best of it without breaking bridges with Brown and de León.

"It's not what it was promised to be," Ammiano said. "That happens in Sacramento, but that doesn't mean it's OK. It has Jerry Brown's hesitant fingers on it and the pro tem's office attempting to live with it. We all know that there are carve outs in it that should not be acceptable."

Ammiano said the bill doesn't go far enough to protect vulnerable immigrants from Trump.

"What do you need?" Ammiano said. "He pardoned (former Arizona Sheriff Joe) Arpaio. He rescinded DACA. What does it take from the governor and pro tem to know this is super inefficient and it's betraying a lot of people?"

As a result of the amendments, the California Police Chiefs Association went from opposing the bill to neutral. The sheriffs' organization remained against SB 54 and U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions had publicly urged Brown to veto it.


Here's some of the things local and state law enforcement cannot do under the bill:

▪ Inquire about an individual's immigration status.

▪ Detain someone on a hold request for the federal government, unless there's a felony warrant or the person has been convicted of one of the more than 800 crimes.

▪ Arrest someone for a civil immigration warrant alone.

▪ Be deputized as immigration agents.

▪ Participate in border patrol activities.

▪ Participate in joint task forces with the federal government if the primary purpose is immigration enforcement.

▪ Notify the federal government of someone's release or transfer someone to federal custody, unless there's a federal warrant or the person has been convicted of one of the more than 800 crimes listed in a revised Trust Act.

end

Taryn Luna: 916-326-5545, @TarynLuna

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article177212866.html#storylink=cpy

Reminder:
"the decisions of who enters Mexico, are made by Mexico and only Mexico"
Luis Videgaray Caso, Mexican Foreign Minister
Friday 10 March, 2017


CANADA: "Our rules, our principles and our laws apply to everyone."
Justin Trudeau, boy PM of Canada. 20 Aug. 2017

end

Thursday, October 5, 2017

AZMEX UPDATE 5-10-17

AZMEX UPDATE 5 OCT 2017


New Tucson Sector Chief of CBP
Wednesday, October 4th 2017, 5:50 pm MST
Wednesday, October 4th 2017, 6:57 pm MST
By Kevin Adger, Reporter
http://www.tucsonnewsnow.com/story/36524574/new-tucson-sector-chief-of-cbp

NOGALES, AZ (Tucson News Now) -
There's a new top agent in charge at the Tucson Sector of U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Chief Rudolfo Karisch took over officially on August 20. He has been with U.S. Customs and Border Protection for more than 31 years, coming to Arizona from Texas.

Wednesday, Oct. 4, he spoke with the local media for the first time at the Tucson sector headquarters on Swan and Golf Links.

"This is an enormous area compared to where I came from, lots of challenges especially the terrain out here with the mountains but I believe it's important for the community to know what we are doing," said new Tucson Sector Chief Rudolfo Karisch.

Tucson News Now spoke with him about concerns the Nogales border community has.

"The more west you get, they get into more problems with drug runners and illegals in that tearing up their country tearing up the water line and tearing up the fences," said Karisch. "I often say this and it's something that's painful of us to hear but we have the appetite in this country if we want to stop drug flow we have to reduce the appetite for drugs but we throw every available piece of technology - aircraft, and agents whether they be on foot, ATV, or horses to patrol these areas."

Nogales Mayor John Doyle would talk to the chief about community involvement.
"We are trying to see how we can work together for the agents to be more on the community to get their families involved," said Mayor Doyle.

For those whose main concern is border security, Chief Karisch has some plans in place to address that.
"I have liked the operations from some areas because of limitations of where stations are built," said Chief Karisch. "I think we're a little too far from the border. We need to actually get closer, but I will be making those adjustments as we move forward."

END


Note: Santa Cruz county be tough on crime. "were designated non-dangerous offenses" "to be served concurrently"
thx


Fifth home invasion suspect sentenced to prison
• Nogales International

• Oct 3, 2017 Updated Oct 3, 2017

http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/fifth-home-invasion-suspect-sentenced-to-prison/article_517ede8e-a84f-11e7-a593-a7feff7ec6e1.html


A fifth suspect in a violent home invasion at a Nogales home last January was sentenced to five years in state prison earlier this month for his involvement in the incident.

Isaac Chaparro, who previously pleaded guilty to one count of kidnapping and one count of first-degree burglary, both Class 2 felony offenses,
was sentenced Sept. 5 by Pima County Superior Judge James E. Marner to five years in prison for each offense, to be served concurrently (at the same time).
He was given credit for 574 days already spent in jail.

Marner served as a visiting judge in the case, which is in the jurisdiction of Santa Cruz County Superior Court.

Because the crimes were designated non-dangerous offenses, Chaparro will be eligible for parole after completing 85 percent of his sentence.
Several other charges, including aggravated assault with a weapon, were dismissed as part of his plea deal.

According to his pre-sentence report, Chaparro told a probation officer during an interview on Aug. 28 that he was "not in my five senses"
when he and three others broke into a home on West Wise Street on Jan. 28, 2016 to steal marijuana.

"I know if I was, I wouldn't have done it," he said. "I feel bad not being with my kids. I feel bad for the victims."


The assailants, dressed in tactical gear and armed with long rifles and handguns, forced their way into the residence and confronted several people,
including a man holding a 2-month-old infant, who was hit on the head with the muzzle of a gun after he refused to put the baby down.
While searching the home for drugs, which they didn't find,
one of the suspects – who informants later identified as Chaparro – fired his weapon after he unexpectedly encountered someone barricaded in a bedroom in the back of the home.


Chaparro, 24, was arrested on Feb. 9, 2016 in Tucson, where he was staying with his sister, two days after police arrested his brother, Juan Ricardo Chaparro, and two others.

After his arrest, the pre-sentence report states, Chaparro allegedly agreed to speak with officers without the presence of an attorney.
However, the interview was cut short after officers realized he "was more interested in learning what information law enforcement had on the case" than cooperating with the investigation.

Despite acknowledging his involvement in the burglary, Chaparro blamed his arrest on those he claimed ratted him out to police.

"I'm here because the people the police interviewed told them I was involved. They all put the blame on me," he told the probation officer.
"Now I know who my friends are. I manned up and said what I did, they didn't.
They said they were high and the police believed them and they got away with it."

He added that there were roughly 10 people involved in the assault, though only seven were arrested in the end.

Asked what sentence he thought the court should impose, Chaparro told the probation officer that after being locked up for "22 months, 23 hours in lockdown,"
which he said afforded him the opportunity to become sober, he hoped the judge would give him a second chance.

"I ask for a second opportunity, we all make mistakes," he said. "I know I can come out ahead in life. I thought a lot and I know I can do good."


However, one of the victims told the court that she lost her home after the incident because the person she was renting from ended the lease after being questioned by police,
and she's struggled to get back on her feet.
She added that though she has known many of the defendants since they were children, she felt a prison sentence of three-to-seven years wasn't enough.
"I trust justice will be done as it should be," she said.

Four of Chaparro's co-defendants have been sentenced.
Gabriel Maldonado was sentenced on July 17 by Judge Thomas Fink to five years in state prison for one count of kidnapping and one count of first-degree burglary.
Fink also sentenced Miguel Huerta Zuniga in March to 10 years for burglary and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.

Armando Ruiz Valencia and Joe Leneer Valencia, who were identified by informants as the people who planned the Jan. 28 home invasion
based on false information that there were 300 pounds of marijuana being stored in the home,
were sentenced in November 2016 to six and 2.5 years in prison, respectively.

Charges are still pending against Juan Ricardo Chaparro and Priscilla Coronado.

end

AZMEX CORRUPTION SPECIAL 5-10-17

AZMEX CORRUPTION SPECIAL 5 OCT 2017

Note: "included liberal groups" Ya sure, you betcha. To this date, nobody fired or in jail.
thx


IRS targeted pro-border security groups for illegal scrutiny: Audit
Report says abusive scrutiny went beyond tea party, included liberal groups
By Stephen Dinan - The Washington Times - Thursday, October 5, 2017

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/oct/5/irs-targeted-pro-border-security-groups-audit/

The IRS singled out pro-border security groups for intrusive scrutiny along with tea party, conservative, Occupy movement and progressive organizations, the tax agency's inspector general said in a new audit Thursday that says political targeting went even deeper than first suspected.
Dozens of liberal groups were snared by the scrutiny from 2004 through 2013, and so were groups that dealt with specific issues such as immigration, health care or marijuana legalization, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration said.
They faced delays in having their nonprofit status applications approved. Many also were subjected to intrusive questions about their political beliefs, donor lists and even their activities at their regular jobs, the audit said.
The targeting wasn't as severe as the tea party, with the number "significantly less" than the conservatives who faced scrutiny, investigators said.
But so-called "Occupy" groups, rank-and-file "progressive" groups, and successors to ACORN, the liberal community organizer, were among those flagged based on names or other triggers, TIGTA said.
Democrats seized on the report as confirmation that there was no political bias in the IRS under the Obama administration, saying the bad behavior was universal.

"This was a case, as I said in the beginning, of gross mismanagement at the IRS, not political targeting," said Rep. Sander Levin, ranking Democrat on the chief tax oversight committee in the House. "But that's not the political narrative the Republicans wanted, so they selectively ignored important facts to skew their 'investigation.'"
Still, Democrats said the report did confirm bungling at the tax agency, which the new audit said stretched back for years, and affected hundreds of groups.
Republicans said that still confirms their suspicions that the agency was operating beyond the law in targeting groups for their political beliefs.
"This report reinforces what government watchdogs and congressional investigators have confirmed time and time again: bureaucrats at the IRS, such as Lois Lerner, arbitrarily and haphazardly administered the tax code and targeted taxpayers based on political ideology," said House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, Texas Republican.
The new audit follows the original 2013 TIGTA report that spotted the illegal targeting of conservative groups, which were pulled out of the usual processing based on conservative-sounding names like including the word "patriot."
Members of Congress asked investigators to go back and see what other inappropriate screens the IRS used, and Thursday's report was the result.
Groups related to the Occupy movement, some health care organizations, medical marijuana advocates, and even groups that wanted a crackdown on illegal immigration — essentially advocating for enforcement of existing law.
The TIGTA report redacted the names of the seven "Border Patrol" groups targeted, and said the IRS was unable to say why it went after them beginning in 2006.
Some 14 groups that were deemed to have sprouted out of the ACORN organization were also snared in the targeting. In those cases, the IRS said, they were targeted because the parent organization had been under federal investigation for years for voter and election fraud.
Nearly half of the ACORN-related groups faced long delays and were asked inappropriate questions.
Those questions may have included names of donors, details on people who attended meetings, demands that group officials disclose their own political leanings and plans, and inquiries about their other work.
In one troubling appendix to the report, the inspector general says the IRS was unable to produce files for eight of the groups investigators were tracking.

Investigators said that inappropriate behavior spanned at least the period from 2004 to 2013, and the agency used more than 250 criteria to single applications out for extra review. Some 17 of those criteria seemed to be centered on politics, the audit said, snaring at least 83 different groups.

By contrast, more than 400 mostly conservative groups were deemed to have been snared by the anti-tea party targeting that spanned 2009 to 2013.

The IRS, in its official response to the report, said the issue was in the past.
"Since the time period covered by the report, the IRS has made significant changes in the way we handle the review process for tax-exempt applications," said Sunita B. Lough, commissioner for the tax-exempt entities division at the IRS.
The commissioner said that includes no longer asking for donor information.

END

AZMEX I3 4-10-17

AZMEX I3 4 OCT 2017


Federal judge upholds Trump's pardon of Arpaio, dismisses conviction
BY KTAR.COM | OCTOBER 4, 2017 AT 11:27 AM
UPDATED: OCTOBER 4, 2017 AT 11:41 AM

http://ktar.com/story/1770499/federal-judge-upholds-trumps-pardon-of-arpaio/

PHOENIX — A federal judge upheld President Donald Trump's pardon of former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio on Wednesday, dashing the long-shot hopes of some of his critics.

Some Democrats and law firms had called for U.S. Judge Susan Bolton to declare the pardon invalid, though experts had said that was unlikely. The Department of Justice had said it supported the pardon.

Arpaio attorney Jack Wilenchik said efforts by outside advocacy groups were a politically motivated waste of time. "I think the judge appreciates that she has to honor a pardon," Wilenchik said.

Bolton's decision means the conviction against Arpaio was formally dismissed. She was still mulling a request from his attorneys to wipe all her rulings from the record.

The hearing came five weeks after Trump pardoned Arpaio's conviction for disobeying a 2011 court order in a racial profiling case to stop his traffic patrols that targeted immigrants.

Trump defended the controversial pardon, saying Arpaio done a "great job for the people of Arizona" and argued that he'd been treated "unbelievable unfairly" by the Obama administration.
"He's done a great job for the people of Arizona. He is very strong on borders, very strong on illegal immigration. He is loved in Arizona," Trump said.

Arpaio's case has cost Maricopa County taxpayers a pretty penny. Earlier this year, it was estimated that court costs in his case would be nearly $100 million.

Last week, the county earmarked $1 million to pay people who were illegally detained by Arpaio's deputies.

END



Note: Si, all democrats.

Phoenix lawmakers urge feds to extend DACA renewal deadline
BY KTAR.COM
OCTOBER 4, 2017 AT 5:22 PM
http://ktar.com/story/1770860/phoenix-lawmakers-urge-feds-to-extend-daca-renewal-deadline/

PHOENIX — Several high-ranking officials in Phoenix, including Mayor Greg Stanton, asked the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to extend the renewal deadline for recipients of the Deferred Act for Childhood Arrivals program.

Stanton, along with Vice Mayor Laura Pastor, and Councilmembers Kate Gallego and Daniel Valenzuela, sent a letter Wednesday to Elaine C. Duke, acting secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

The Trump administration ended the Deferred Act for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA, in September, leaving a six-month window to allow Congress to decide whether it wants to write legislation to protect the so-called DREAMers.

DACA was an Obama-era program that granted temporary work permits to undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children.

Recipients of the program had until Oct. 5 to renew their status if it expires before March 5, 2018.

But Stanton, Pastor, Gallego and Valenzuela are urging Duke to extend the deadline, calling the current Oct. 5 deadline "arbitrary and capricious and only serves to impose extreme hardship on the thousands of hard-working DACA recipients in our state who will not be allowed DACA renewals."

The lawmakers also claimed that the "expedited DACA renewal deadline will only hurt Arizona's economy," saying rescinding the program could cost Arizona "more than $1.3 billion each year in lost Gross Domestic Product."

"DACA recipients are young people who contribute so much to the City of Phoenix through their work, entrepreneurial ventures, and artistic expression.

"More importantly, these young women and men — who are fathers, mothers, brothers, sisters, friends and valued neighbors — stand to be forced out of the only home they've ever known. Phoenix stands with DREAMers in our city, across Arizona and throughout the nation.

"We urge you to act swiftly and use your authority to extend the renewal deadline with input from the public through existing rulemaking procedures," part of the letter read.

Nearly 800,000 young immigrants had been granted a reprieve from deportation and the ability to work legally in the U.S. under the program.

Arizona is home to about 4 percent of all DACA recipients nationwide, with about 25,500 young undocumented immigrants in Arizona enrolled in the program, according to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services data.

In August, Stanton reaffirmed his commitment to the DREAMers, saying that he would stand by them if Trump was to end the program. The Phoenix mayor even donated $10,000 from his campaign funds to help the recipients cover the $495 renewal fee.

A group of senators reintroduced legislation to give those immigrants a path to citizenship in July, but the future of the legislation is unknown.

end


Reminder:

"Mexico decides who enters our country"
"the decisions of who enters Mexico, are made by Mexico and only Mexico"
Luis Videgaray Caso, Mexican Foreign Minister
10 March, 2017
Http://www.eldiariodesonora.com.mx/notas.php?nota=87134

CANADA: "Our rules, our principles and our laws apply to everyone."
Justin Trudeau, boy PM of Canada. 20 Aug. 2017

end

AZMEX I3 30-9-17

AZMEX I3 30 SEP 2017

Note: Some may remember the chain's management saying they
"will continue to work to earn the trust and patronage of our millions of loyal guests."
( except maybe for Americans?)
Ref: AZMEX I3 15 SEP 2017
Gracias


Group of undocumented immigrants arrested at Motel 6
By Paulina Pineda
Nogales International Sep 28, 2017

http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/group-of-undocumented-immigrants-arrested-at-motel/article_15ba3b76-a4a0-11e7-834c-132d2198ceb5.html

The Motel 6 on Mariposa Road in Nogales.
Photo by Jonathan Clark

Nogales police, in collaboration with the U.S. Border Patrol, arrested five undocumented immigrants staying at the local Motel 6.

The bust earlier this month came amid mounting concern over the extent of the national hotel chain's cooperation with federal immigration officials in Arizona, though the company said in a statement that it doesn't believe its employees were involved in the Nogales incident.

According to the police report, which the Nogales Police Department provided to the NI, five NPD officers working the Operation Stonegarden detail responded to the hotel on West Mariposa Road at about 6:24 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 13 after receiving a request to assist the Border Patrol. Stonegarden is a federal program in which local police officers earn overtime by supporting federal agencies with immigration enforcement.

In an emailed statement on Sept. 21, the Border Patrol's Tucson Sector public information office said agents from the Nogales Station responded to the motel to assist the Nogales Police Department after a suspicious person call.

"It was reported that a concerned citizen called regarding possible human smuggling that was taking place at the Motel 6," the agency said, adding that "agents apprehended people in connection to a possible human-smuggling case including people who were in the country illegally."

In total, five men and two women were arrested and referred to the Border Patrol.

The incident occurred the same day the Phoenix New Times reported that employees at two Motel 6 locations in Phoenix regularly supplied law enforcement with information about hotel guests. A review of court records found that between February and August, agents with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested at least 20 people at the two locations, though the New Times believes the number is likely higher.

In a statement issued the following day – after a barrage of negative comments on social media – Motel 6 said the practice was undertaken at the local level "without the knowledge of senior management."

A manager at the Nogales branch directed questions to Motel 6's media hotline. However, the number he provided was incorrect.

The company said based on a preliminary investigation of the incident, it does not believe Motel 6 staff called NPD or immigration officers.

"Local Motel 6 staff did not call the Nogales Police Department, nor were they in contact with Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Additionally, no information was requested nor provided by the property to the authorities," according to a statement provided by corporate spokeswoman Raiza Rehkoff. "The Nogales Police Department arrived at the property on the evening of Sept. 13 and proceeded directly to guest room #217 without any contact with the property staff. Our understanding is that they did so on the basis of an outside, anonymous tip."

Room 217

According to the police report, officers were informed that "possible undocumented aliens (were) being house inside room #217." The report did not mention how police were made aware of this or how they knew what room number the group was staying in.

A supplemental report written by a responding officer states that after he and a fellow officer knocked on the door, a male subject "dressed in dirty/smelly clothing" opened the door.

The officer asked him in English if he had rented the room, but the man allegedly didn't understand. After the officer asked him again in Spanish, the man said no.

"I immediately noticed four additional subjects in the same condition lying on the hotel bed and asked the subjects if they were illegally in the United States," the officer wrote.

The men allegedly told the officer that they had entered the country illegally and were waiting to be picked up. A wants and warrants check revealed none of the men had a criminal record in the United States, according to the report.

Another supplemental report states that while responding to the hotel, one of the officers overheard on the radio that two female subjects believed to be involved in the incident had left the hotel on foot toward North Grand Avenue. The officer then made contact with the women, who said they were at the Motel 6 pool, but the water was too cold, so they decided to walk to Walgreens.

The officer asked to see identification and they both handed over Arizona ID cards, the report states.

Asked if they were renting a room at the motel, the women said yes and confirmed that they were staying in room 217.

"I advised them that undocumented aliens were detained in that room so they were going to be detained," the officer wrote in the report, adding that one of the women said the other had told her the men in the room were her friends.

The women were transported back to Motel 6 and referred to the Border Patrol along with the five men.

Asked how the agency was made aware that there was a group of undocumented immigrants staying at the hotel, the sector's public information office said: "We do not know the identity of the person who called, but we encourage anyone witnessing any suspicious or illegal activity of any (kind) to call either 911 or the United States Border Patrol."

The Border Patrol did not respond to a question asking if Motel 6 shared guest information with the agency.

Since the Phoenix New Times story was published, Motel 6 said the company will review its policies regarding the practice of sharing guest information with law enforcement.

In a statement issued on Sept. 20, the company said: "(W)e are currently in the process of a comprehensive review of our practices and will issue updated, company-wide guidelines soon. As part of this review process, we intend to implement a policy that our locations will not voluntarily furnish guest lists to authorities unless subject to a compulsory process, such as a subpoena or warrant, or under truly extenuating circumstances, such as an imminent threat to public or guest safety."

END



Reminder:
MEXICO: "the decisions of who enters Mexico, are made by Mexico and only Mexico"
Luis Videgaray Caso, Mexican Foreign Minister
10 March, 2017

CANADA: "Our rules, our principles and our laws apply to everyone."
Justin Trudeau, boy PM of Canada. 20 Aug. 2017

So, Canada and Mexico can decide who enters their countries, but it is only the USA that cannot control who enters our country?
Gracias, Merci, Thx

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

AZMEX I3 2-10-17

AZMEX I3 2 OCT 2017

Note: Crossing the border legally is still not dangerous. "He can't get a job without documents,"
thx


For Muslim refugees in Mexico, community is hard to find
Madeleine Wattenbarger
Spencer Platt/Getty Images
October 1, 2017

http://theweek.com/articles/727392/muslim-refugees-mexico-community-hard-find

Ali came to the Americas by way of Ecuador in late 2016. He'd just finished a university degree in Malaysia, where he'd earned a scholarship to study construction management. He couldn't return to Saudi Arabia, where he'd lived before, nor to his now-war-torn home of Yemen. He moved to Ecuador because he'd heard he would be able to get residency there. But that hope never came to fruition. Once he arrived, he found he could only stay for six months. So he went then to the United States embassy, to try his luck at getting a student visa.

"I wanted to do a master's program," says Ali, who requested to be identified only by his second name for security. "So I went to the embassy to apply. I paid $30. The girl came and said that they thought I was from Saudi Arabia, but because I was from Yemen, I couldn't get a visa." The first of President Trump's so-called "travel bans" had just gone into effect in the U.S.

It was after all this that Ali traveled to Mexico, with the hopes of continuing on to the U.S. Once in Mexico, Ali was connected with Programa Casa Refugiados, a Mexico City-based non-governmental organization that provides services to asylum seekers and refugees. Programa Casa Refugiados helped him regularize his status as a temporary resident in Mexico and continue his studies in a technical degree program.

Ali is among the refugees to hail from one of the countries affected by Trump's executive order. Many of them are now seeking to settle in Mexico City. What keeps Ali in Mexico is not the danger of crossing the border, but rather the new administration's anti-immigrant rhetoric.

Coming from Muslim-majority countries to Mexico, a deeply Catholic one, and transitioning from Arabic- and English-speaking countries to a Spanish-speaking one, is already an uphill battle for many refugees. Many come to Mexico with the original goal of crossing the northern border into the U.S., where they may have connections through family or friends. But in choosing to stay in Mexico, they can find themselves in an unfamiliar country where they have little social support. Many face unique challenges to integration in Mexican society.

In Mexico, asylum requests have been on the rise since 2011. From 2011 to 2015, the number of asylum requests increased more than threefold, according to statistics from the Comisión Mexicana de Ayuda a Refugiados (COMAR), the Mexican government's official body for asylum seekers and refugees.

In 2015, COMAR recognized almost a third of the 3,423 asylum requests received. An overwhelming majority of asylum seekers in Mexico come from the Northern Triangle — the Central American countries of Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador; according to the United Nations High Commission of Refugees, asylum seekers from the Northern Triangle make up 90 percent of overall requests. The remaining 10 percent or so move from countries including Haiti, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Cameroon, according to Programa Casa Refugiados.

Mexico City in particular has taken steps to encourage pro-immigrant policy measures. The 2011 Law of Interculturality, Attention to Migrants, and Human Mobility laid out principles for anti-discrimination, hospitality, and migrants' rights, and instituted the Commission of Interculturality and Human Mobility. A recent campaign funded by the U.N. and the Mexico City government papered the city with pro-migrant public-service announcements. Yet the reality remains that resettlement can be grueling. Rather than being a destination in itself, Mexico, to many migrants, remains a country of transit, the final obstacle before either crossing the U.S.-Mexico border illegally or requesting asylum at the border.

"I imagine people come to Mexico because of being close to the United States," says Vania Ruiz, the lasting solutions coordinator at Programa Casa Refugiados. "Mexico represents a step closer to the U.S., so there may be the possibility of going there eventually."

The U.S. government doesn't release statistics on how many asylum requests are made at the southern border, but many of the asylum seekers that Post-Conviction Relief aids decide to keep going north. Those include migrants not only from Central America, but also from Haiti and sub-Saharan Africa, all crossing Mexico in the hopes of resettling in the U.S. In recent months, Tijuana migrant shelters have been overwhelmed by Haitian asylum seekers awaiting their trial dates. Asylum requests in the U.S. have been consistently rising since 2010; in 2015, about a quarter of the over 83,000 requests were approved.

The U.S. refugee resettlement program aims to settle refugees in communities with others of their nationality. As a result, immigrants and refugees with shared origins have formed clusters across the country. Detroit and New York City are home to high concentrations of Arab Americans; Minneapolis is home to a population of over 31,000 Somali immigrants, many of whom arrived as refugees.

In contrast, Mexico hasn't seen significant immigration from Arab countries. The country has a foreign-born population of under 1 percent, compared to the U.S.'s foreign-born population of 13.1 percent, and, as of 2009, the majority of those foreigners originated from the U.S., Canada, Europe, or Latin America.

"There's no one from my country here," Ali says, "and that can be difficult."

The 2010 Mexican census registered 3,740 Muslims nationwide, out of a population of 112 million. Even among Muslims, or people from Arabic-speaking countries, cultures are more diverse than the blanket label suggests. Not all Muslim-majority countries — nor Muslims, nor Arabic speakers — share more than superficial characteristics. Arabic dialects vary wildly between regions, and communication between different dialects can be nearly impossible.

"I've met some Egyptians who I can talk to in Arabic," Ali says. "But I met some Moroccans and Algerians, and I can't understand them." There's a small mosque near the guesthouse where Ali is currently staying, but he doesn't know many Muslims are in Mexico, aside from other refugees he met through the organization giving him aid.

Beyond the difficulties of cultural adjustment, asylum seekers and refugees face an uphill battle in the basic tasks of finding a livelihood in Mexico. Abdi (who also requested his second name be used for security reasons) has been in Mexico City for five months. He's still waiting to hear whether his asylum request will be approved, and he is in limbo until then. He can't get a job without documents, and he can't leave the city until his asylum process ends.

Abdi came from Somalia to start his journey throughout the Americas in Brazil, where he attempted to request asylum with no success.
He traveled by bus and on foot with other migrants from Haiti and Cuba.
They went through Peru and continued through Central America.
In each country, Abdi tried to request asylum, but he encountered problems with documentation.
He arrived in Tapachula, Mexico, in January. Abdi had planned to keep going north, but the day he left detention at the migration center in Tapachula, he heard the same news Ali did: Trump had just signed the travel ban.

Abdi continued on to Mexico City, where he requested asylum at COMAR. According to COMAR policy, asylum seekers should receive a resolution on their status within 45 business days of their request. Several months after filing his request, though, Abdi still hasn't received any notification about his status. Even if he receives his refugee status, Abdi anticipates life in Mexico to be difficult.

"It's better to have an identity than to have nothing," he says. "The community is good and the people are good, but economically it's not very stable."


He's living at a guesthouse with several other refugees, some of whom are in the same situation.
For a while, Abdi tried to apply for jobs, but he found businesses unreceptive to a foreigner with little grasp of Spanish.
"For any job like cleaning or working in a restaurant, they prefer to hire people who are from here.
In terms of survival it's very hard," he says.


Abdi has received aid from Programa Casa Refugiados during his asylum process, but, according to Ruiz, asylum seekers can only receive three months' worth of funding and support. If he doesn't receive refugee status, he'll probably try to go to the U.S. He doesn't know anyone there, but he knows there's a Somali community. Though he doesn't expect a journey to the states to be much easier, it may provide a reprieve from locating aid in Mexico. "Survival is difficult when you're always depending on organizations."

Ali, on the other hand, feels at home in Mexico. He thinks he'll be here for at least three years as he finishes up his schooling. After that, he might stay in Mexico or try to move to Canada. One thing is for certain: He won't be heading to the U.S.

This story originally appeared as For Muslim Refugees in Mexico, a search for community on Pacific Standard, an editorial partner site. Subscribe to the magazine's newsletter and follow Pacific Standard on Twitter to support journalism in the public interest.

END

AZMEX STINKING SPECIAL 1-10-17

AZMEX STINKING SPECIAL 1 OCT 2017

Note: of local interest mostly, or anyone else downwind.
thx


IBWC to fight judge's ruling that it partly owns IOI
By Paulina Pineda
Nogales International Sep 29, 2017

http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/ibwc-to-fight-judge-s-ruling-that-it-partly-owns/article_e9960e50-a4ac-11e7-966c-5bc2b5b9382d.html

IBWC Citizens Forum
IBWC Assistant Attorney Rebecca Rizzuti addresses the roughly 60 attendees at the quarterly meeting of the Southeast Arizona Citizens Forum on Thursday, Sept. 21 in Tubac.
Photo by Paulina Pineda
A final resolution to a long-running legal battle between the International Boundary and Water Commission and the City of Nogales over the ownership of a binational sewer line could be prolonged after a lawyer with the federal agency indicated at a public meeting last week that the IBWC plans to appeal a magistrate judge's recommendation that it is a partial owner of the entire line.

"You might wonder why there's a lawyer giving this presentation," quipped Rebecca Rizzuti, assistant attorney with IBWC, her statement met by laughs from the roughly 60 people who attended last Thursday's Southeast Arizona Citizens Forum at the Tubac Community Center.

During the meeting, hosted by an advisory group working with the IBWC, Rizzuti gave a presentation on the history of the Nogales International Sanitation Project, which includes the International Wastewater Treatment Plant and the International Outfall Interceptor, the binational sewer line that carries millions of gallons of waste each day from Ambos Nogales to the treatment plant in Rio Rico, in addition to an update on the lawsuit.

The IBWC is being sued by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality over Clean Water Act violations stemming from contaminants found in the treatment plant and IOI. The IBWC in turn sued the state and City of Nogales alleging that if the pipeline was leaking contaminants into the Nogales Wash, it was the city's responsibility to remedy the problem.

Rizzuti said the problem stems from surcharge that spills out of the manholes in the IOI and occurs when there is a blockage in the system or an abundance of stormwater, as often occurs during the summer monsoon season.

"So stormwater and wastewater will come out of those manholes on occasion and the lawsuit deals with who's responsible for or who's liable for the surcharges that occur along this line," she said. "The state and the city contend it's USIBWC. USIBWC contends the IOI is a city line."

In April, U.S. Magistrate Judge D. Thomas Ferraro issued a "report and recommendation," which noted that the IBWC is at least a partial owner or operator of the IOI and the agency is aware that wastewater is continuously discharged from the pipeline into the wash in violation of Arizona state statute. The judge ruled that IBWC could not transfer responsibility for the lawsuit to the city, and that since the contaminants weren't coming from the city's system, the problem was out of the government entity's control.

The IBWC filed an objection and on Sept. 20, a district judge adopted Ferraro's recommendation that because the IBWC admits partial ownership, it was liable for the surcharge, Rizzuti said.

Despite the judge's order, she said, the agency's position hasn't changed.

"We disagree," she said, adding that the IBWC will request a remedy. "(A)nd when there is a final order issued, if the IOI is found still to be our responsibility, we are discussing with the Department of Justice an appeal of that finding."

City 'prevails'

Maintenance of the sewer line is the shared responsibility of the City of Nogales and the IBWC as the result of an arrangement dating to 1953. The sanitation project originally consisted of a 7,200-foot sewer line in Mexico, an 8,146-foot pipeline in the United States and a treatment plant about 1.5 miles north of the border.

In 1965, the city requested that IBWC negotiate an agreement with Mexico to enlarge the capacity of the treatment plant, and also asked that the plant be relocated to its present site near the Rio Rico Industrial Park. In 1996, the IBWC took over operation of the treatment plant.

During her presentation, Rizzuti said the city claims the IBWC owns about 78 percent of the IOI, while the IBWC contends that the city owns 100 percent of the line.

Regardless of who owns it, Rizzuti added, the city signed a contract agreeing to operate and maintain the line and to absolve Mexico of any costs associated with its operation and maintenance.

She also argued that Minute 227 of the treaty, which negotiated the extension of the line and relocation of the plant, acknowledges that the relocation was necessary for domestic, and not international, purposes and therefore Mexico and the IBWC share no responsibility for maintaining and operating it.

"We don't manage the IOI, we don't allow connections to it, we don't have anything to do with the domestic operation of the IOI," she said, adding later: "We don't make money off the operation of the IOI. We are not a wastewater treatment system biller."

Speaking by phone Thursday morning, City Attorney Jose Luis Machado said the district judge's ruling was "a step in the right direction for the city."

"We prevailed against IBWC and the litigation between ADEQ and IBWC continues regarding the contaminants coming from Mexico," he said, adding: "It doesn't resolve all the issue because IBWC disagrees with the judge in that position, but the only opinion that matters here is the judge's opinion and he's ruled in favor of the City of Nogales. Until that's appealed and until that's overturned, that is the law of this case – IBWC has an ownership interest in the IOI."

Machado called IBWC's position regarding the ownership of the line "ludicrous," noting that though IBWC tried to argue that it was a partial owner of the original trunkline but not the extension, the judge ruled that the pipeline was one continuous line.

"IBWC's position is that they don't have any authority on the sewer line. If you don't have any authority, then what have you been doing down here the last 50 years?" he asked. "They take responsibility when they want it and they absolve themselves of every responsibility when they want to. Their whole existence is to address sanitation and flood problems of international character and yet they say they can't."

He said city staff is preparing its own presentation regarding the ownership of the IOI and Nogales Wash that will be presented during the October city council meeting.

end



Oomapas repairs water line
Details Posted on Saturday September 30, 2017, Written by Editorial Staff / El Diario
http://www.eldiariodesonora.com.mx/notas.php?nota=97948

Nogales

Directed by Mauro Corrales Bujanda, staff of the Municipal Operator for Drinking Water, Sewer and Sanitation (Oomapas) worked intensely on the immediate repair of a four-inch diameter water line in the Mediterranean Fraccionamiento. (neighborhood)

According to the new policy applied by the Municipal President in the area of ​​citizen care, the drinking water leakage that resulted from the rupture of the four-inch diameter pipe was reported in the Circuito Tierra Street of that colony was solved .

He emphasized that as well as this fault that was attended to promptly, all other problems that are detected or reported, are solved quickly and efficiently, while continuing to provide regular services, such as water delivery by pipes.

He announced that there are other tasks that the various crews do to keep the water distribution networks in good condition, as well as the collection system of black water. (sewage)

According to Mauro Corrales, the instructions of the Municipal President are precise and conclusive, which is why the agency's operational area is working hard to meet all the needs of citizens, as well as the maintenance of water infrastructure.

END

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

AZMEX STINKING SPECIAL 1-10-17

AZMEX STINKING SPECIAL 1 OCT 2017

Note: of local interest mostly, or anyone else downwind.
thx


IBWC to fight judge's ruling that it partly owns IOI
By Paulina Pineda
Nogales International Sep 29, 2017

http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/ibwc-to-fight-judge-s-ruling-that-it-partly-owns/article_e9960e50-a4ac-11e7-966c-5bc2b5b9382d.html

IBWC Citizens Forum
IBWC Assistant Attorney Rebecca Rizzuti addresses the roughly 60 attendees at the quarterly meeting of the Southeast Arizona Citizens Forum on Thursday, Sept. 21 in Tubac.
Photo by Paulina Pineda

A final resolution to a long-running legal battle between the International Boundary and Water Commission and the City of Nogales over the ownership of a binational sewer line could be prolonged after a lawyer with the federal agency indicated at a public meeting last week that the IBWC plans to appeal a magistrate judge's recommendation that it is a partial owner of the entire line.

"You might wonder why there's a lawyer giving this presentation," quipped Rebecca Rizzuti, assistant attorney with IBWC, her statement met by laughs from the roughly 60 people who attended last Thursday's Southeast Arizona Citizens Forum at the Tubac Community Center.

During the meeting, hosted by an advisory group working with the IBWC, Rizzuti gave a presentation on the history of the Nogales International Sanitation Project, which includes the International Wastewater Treatment Plant and the International Outfall Interceptor, the binational sewer line that carries millions of gallons of waste each day from Ambos Nogales to the treatment plant in Rio Rico, in addition to an update on the lawsuit.

The IBWC is being sued by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality over Clean Water Act violations stemming from contaminants found in the treatment plant and IOI. The IBWC in turn sued the state and City of Nogales alleging that if the pipeline was leaking contaminants into the Nogales Wash, it was the city's responsibility to remedy the problem.

Rizzuti said the problem stems from surcharge that spills out of the manholes in the IOI and occurs when there is a blockage in the system or an abundance of stormwater, as often occurs during the summer monsoon season.

"So stormwater and wastewater will come out of those manholes on occasion and the lawsuit deals with who's responsible for or who's liable for the surcharges that occur along this line," she said. "The state and the city contend it's USIBWC. USIBWC contends the IOI is a city line."

In April, U.S. Magistrate Judge D. Thomas Ferraro issued a "report and recommendation," which noted that the IBWC is at least a partial owner or operator of the IOI and the agency is aware that wastewater is continuously discharged from the pipeline into the wash in violation of Arizona state statute. The judge ruled that IBWC could not transfer responsibility for the lawsuit to the city, and that since the contaminants weren't coming from the city's system, the problem was out of the government entity's control.

The IBWC filed an objection and on Sept. 20, a district judge adopted Ferraro's recommendation that because the IBWC admits partial ownership, it was liable for the surcharge, Rizzuti said.

Despite the judge's order, she said, the agency's position hasn't changed.

"We disagree," she said, adding that the IBWC will request a remedy. "(A)nd when there is a final order issued, if the IOI is found still to be our responsibility, we are discussing with the Department of Justice an appeal of that finding."

City 'prevails'

Maintenance of the sewer line is the shared responsibility of the City of Nogales and the IBWC as the result of an arrangement dating to 1953. The sanitation project originally consisted of a 7,200-foot sewer line in Mexico, an 8,146-foot pipeline in the United States and a treatment plant about 1.5 miles north of the border.

In 1965, the city requested that IBWC negotiate an agreement with Mexico to enlarge the capacity of the treatment plant, and also asked that the plant be relocated to its present site near the Rio Rico Industrial Park. In 1996, the IBWC took over operation of the treatment plant.

During her presentation, Rizzuti said the city claims the IBWC owns about 78 percent of the IOI, while the IBWC contends that the city owns 100 percent of the line.

Regardless of who owns it, Rizzuti added, the city signed a contract agreeing to operate and maintain the line and to absolve Mexico of any costs associated with its operation and maintenance.

She also argued that Minute 227 of the treaty, which negotiated the extension of the line and relocation of the plant, acknowledges that the relocation was necessary for domestic, and not international, purposes and therefore Mexico and the IBWC share no responsibility for maintaining and operating it.

"We don't manage the IOI, we don't allow connections to it, we don't have anything to do with the domestic operation of the IOI," she said, adding later: "We don't make money off the operation of the IOI. We are not a wastewater treatment system biller."

Speaking by phone Thursday morning, City Attorney Jose Luis Machado said the district judge's ruling was "a step in the right direction for the city."

"We prevailed against IBWC and the litigation between ADEQ and IBWC continues regarding the contaminants coming from Mexico," he said, adding: "It doesn't resolve all the issue because IBWC disagrees with the judge in that position, but the only opinion that matters here is the judge's opinion and he's ruled in favor of the City of Nogales. Until that's appealed and until that's overturned, that is the law of this case – IBWC has an ownership interest in the IOI."

Machado called IBWC's position regarding the ownership of the line "ludicrous," noting that though IBWC tried to argue that it was a partial owner of the original trunkline but not the extension, the judge ruled that the pipeline was one continuous line.

"IBWC's position is that they don't have any authority on the sewer line. If you don't have any authority, then what have you been doing down here the last 50 years?" he asked. "They take responsibility when they want it and they absolve themselves of every responsibility when they want to. Their whole existence is to address sanitation and flood problems of international character and yet they say they can't."

He said city staff is preparing its own presentation regarding the ownership of the IOI and Nogales Wash that will be presented during the October city council meeting.

end



Oomapas repairs water line
Details Posted on Saturday September 30, 2017, Written by Editorial Staff / El Diario
http://www.eldiariodesonora.com.mx/notas.php?nota=97948

Nogales

Directed by Mauro Corrales Bujanda, staff of the Municipal Operator for Drinking Water, Sewer and Sanitation (Oomapas) worked intensely on the immediate repair of a four-inch diameter water line in the Mediterranean Fraccionamiento. (neighborhood)

According to the new policy applied by the Municipal President in the area of ​​citizen care, the drinking water leakage that resulted from the rupture of the four-inch diameter pipe was reported in the Circuito Tierra Street of that colony was solved .

He emphasized that as well as this fault that was attended to promptly, all other problems that are detected or reported, are solved quickly and efficiently, while continuing to provide regular services, such as water delivery by pipes.

He announced that there are other tasks that the various crews do to keep the water distribution networks in good condition, as well as the collection system of black water. (sewage)

According to Mauro Corrales, the instructions of the Municipal President are precise and conclusive, which is why the agency's operational area is working hard to meet all the needs of citizens, as well as the maintenance of water infrastructure.

END