Saturday, September 13, 2014

AZMEX UPDATE 13-9-14

AZMEX UPDATE 13 SEP 2014

Note: One can only imagine the deals that were made.



Mexico closes customs checkpoint south of Nogales, Sonora
A banner at the Mexican customs checkpoint at Agua Zarca, 21 kilometers south of the U.S.-Mexico border, announces its closure.
Posted: Friday, September 12, 2014 4:47 pm | Updated: 5:58 pm, Fri Sep 12, 2014.
By Murphy Woodhouse
Nogales International

http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/mexico-closes-customs-checkpoint-south-of-nogales-sonora/article_2689536e-3ad7-11e4-aa3f-0f49fb244d55.html

The Mexican government has closed its customs checkpoint on Highway 15 south of Nogales, Sonora, eliminating a second layer of inspection at the border that President Enrique Peña Nieto said had become unnecessary and cumbersome.

For southbound commercial and tourist vehicle traffic, the closure of the Agua Zarca checkpoint will likely mean shorter wait times for those headed south to Hermosillo and beyond. Immigration services at the facility, commonly known as Kilometer 21, will be unaffected.

Miguel Pacheco, owner of Nogales-based USA-Mex-Can Transport, said that the change will speed up the truckloads of heavy machinery his company takes into Mexico up to five times daily during peak months.
"It's going to be really good because there will be no more delays at Kilometer 21," he said.
According to Pacheco, those delays lasted up to two hours, on top of crossing delays near the border, depending on "how many trucks are to be inspected."

Two other interior Sonoran checkpoints, Cabullona south of Agua Prieta and San Antonio near Imuris, were also closed, as well six others in in the border states of Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, and Tamaulipas, according to an announcement Friday by Peña Nieto.

"Today we arrived at the last stage, the last step toward closing the last checkpoints that have no reason to be and which will make travel much faster, more comfortable and safer for those who previously had to pass through customs checkpoints," the president said during a speech in Reynosa, Tamaulipas.
The checkpoints are run by the Mexico's Tax Administration Service (SAT), the federal agency tasked with enforcing the country's customs laws.

Mexican customs revisions at the border itself – including those immediately south of the Dennis DeConcini and Mariposa ports of entry – are not affected by the change and travellers will still have to pass through them.

Also unchanged is the requirement that foreign travelers heading south of Kilometer 21 must obtain a tourist permit from Mexico's National Migration Institute (INM). Those who don't pick up a permit at the INM office on the south side on the DeConcini port can still apply at the office at Kilometer 21, according to INM Nogales delegate Carla Veronica Vazquez.

"Independently of the fact that there will no longer be a customs inspection, foreigners and nationals of other countries must come to the migration office to get documented," she said.

Vazquez said that she had received no word that indicated that the president's announcement will affect her agency's work south of Nogales.

"As of right now, we have not received any other instruction," she said. "We will remain at Kilometer 21 issuing permits to foreigners and nationals of the United States or any other country."

Vazquez said that Banjercito, the agency that issues vehicle import permits for drivers traveling outside of Sonora's permit-free zone, will also continue its operations at Kilometer 21. A woman who answered the phone Friday at Banjercito's Agua Zarca office also said operations there remain unchanged.

In a speech in May in Cancun announcing the closure of several customs checkpoints in Southern Mexico, Peña Nieto said the days of drivers being "daily bothered by having to pass through (interior) customs checkpoints" are over. According to a news release posted Friday on the SAT website, 26 of the nation's 40 interior customs checkpoints have now been eliminated since Peña Nieto took office in 2012.

On Friday in Reynosa, Peña Nieto also announced the lifting of a $14,000 cap on monthly U.S. dollar deposits from border-area Mexican businesses, an anti-money laundering measure that had been in place since 2010.

END




Note: and then we have this:

Feds to fly in radiation expert
In this file photo from January, a Border Patrol agent shows how the X-ray van at the Interstate 19 checkpoint detects contraband.

Posted: Friday, September 12, 2014 8:04 am | Updated: 9:18 am, Fri Sep 12, 2014.
By Curt Prendergast
Nogales International

http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/feds-to-fly-in-radiation-expert/article_284b9c82-3a8e-11e4-9a11-a7990d7ef3eb.html

In response to concerns aired by the Nogales City Council, the federal government plans to fly a radiation expert to Nogales to explain whether radiation levels at local ports of entry pose a health risk to residents, customs officers and border-crossers.

At issue is the Z-Portal that was deployed at the Dennis DeConcini Port of Entry earlier this year. The system, which uses low energy X-rays to scan vehicles for contraband, was first used at the San Ysidro, Calif. port of entry in 2008. Since then, CBP has expanded its use along the U.S.-Mexico border.

The City of Nogales is the first border town government to complain about the radiation, said Joe Agosttini, assistant port director for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, at the council's regular meeting Wednesday.
"We appreciate that opportunity for us to give you that proof and the study so that everybody can feel comfortable and at ease," he said.
"We will fly an expert from Washington, D.C. who has an extensive background," Agosttini said. "He has a history of all the research that we conducted throughout the Mexican land border."

The item was put on the meeting's agenda by Mayor Arturo Garino, who said residents had approached him with worries about the equipment used by CBP to X-ray vehicles.
"Even if we have one concerned citizen, as a council we should address the issue," Garino said.
Nogales resident Marvin Yamamoto, who said he operated nuclear reactors for the U.S. Navy, asked why no radiation warning signs are on the equipment at local ports of entry.
"What are the levels? They're not telling us and I'd like to know what they are," Yamamoto said.
He also questioned the safety of CBP vans equipped with "backscatter" technology that can inspect cars on the street.
"If I'm standing on the street, I'm going to get zapped," he said.

The "controlled area" from a van equipped with the system extends 24 feet from the side where the X-ray beam is located and 5 feet from the other three sides, according to the environmental assessment conducted by CBP in 2008.
The vans also raise questions about illegal searches, Yamamoto said. "Isn't that search without a warrant? What's the justification for that?" he asked.

The European Union banned such scanners from their ports for safety reasons, he said, adding: "I'd like to hear why it's allowed in the United States, but it's unsafe in Europe."
After reading a story in the NI in which Garino floated the idea of the city conducting a study of health risks posed by the Z-Portal, Agosttini said, he decided to address the council.
"A study of radiation is going to be a very expensive project for the city," he said.
Private companies, in conjunction with federal nuclear regulators, conducted a study of potential radiation exposure and the expert will explain the systems that monitor pedestrians, private vehicles, and cargo, he said.

Vice Mayor Nubar Hanessian asked if the expert could speak to the council members at their next meeting, slated for Oct. 1. Agosttini said he could not commit to that date without speaking with his superiors at CBP.

Reports on risks
X-rays give off ionizing radiation that strips electrons from molecules. Those electrons then damage other cells, which in high doses can cause cancer, as well as mental disabilities in children whose mothers were exposed to radiation while pregnant, according to a 2006 report by the National Academy of Sciences.
No negative health effects have been shown among workers exposed to low doses of radiation for long periods of time, according to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However, any radiation may pose some risk for causing cancer.

So far, Agosttini said, he has not received reports of health problems arising from the equipment.
Customs officers carry a radiation detection device on their belts for the dual purpose of monitoring the Z-Portal's radiation and any nuclear contraband that drivers may attempt to smuggle, he said.

Massachusetts-based American Science and Engineering, Inc. supplies CBP with the Z-Portal systems.
The company says the amount of radiation received by a person going through a Z-Portal is equivalent to one minute of flying in an airplane at 30,000 feet, due to increased exposure to cosmic rays at high altitudes, or 1 percent of what an average person receives on any given day.

The machine can handle 80 trucks, or 120 passenger vehicles, per hour, according to ASE. The machine automatically shuts off if the speed of a vehicle drops below a certain level, which would increase the amount of exposure.

The 2008 environmental assessment concluded the system would not create measurable health risks for border crossers or CBP employees operating the system.

Vehicle occupants would have to pass through the Z-Portal 33,333 times in a year to exceed exposure limits set by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Radiation exposure from the vans would be even less, according to the CBP assessment, given that occupants exit the vehicle before it is scanned. For people hidden inside vehicles, the radiation exposure would be 118,000 times below permissible levels.

However, van operators face the greatest risk, reaching one-fourth of the permissible levels if they run the system 2,000 hours in a year.

Built-in shielding in the stationary Z-Portal and a "controlled area" line that customs officers stand behind while operating the system will protect officers and port employees, the assessment says. The controlled area extends 10 feet from the exit and entrance, where the shielding does not protect from radiation.

More Coverage
Radiation at local ports on city's agenda

END



Note: Background.

Nacional
Publicado septiembre 12, 2014, 11:33 pm
Anuncia Peña el cierre de garitas
enrique peña Nieto
REFORMA
Reynosa, Tamaulipas - Nuevo Día

http://nuevodia.com.mx/seccion/nacional/anuncia-pena-el-cierre-de-garitas

El presidente Enrique Peña Nieto anunció el cierre definitivo de la garita aduanal de Anáhuac, Nuevo León, llamada "Camarón", así como las del kilómetro 26 en la carretera a Nuevo Laredo y la del kilómetro 30 en la vía a Reynosa, entre otras.
En un evento celebrado en el Parque Cultural de Reynosa, denominado Mejoramiento del Régimen para Operaciones con Dólares en Efectivo y Cierre de Garitas", Peña arrancó un fuerte aplauso de más de mil 200 invitados cuando anunció el cierre de garitas de Reynosa y otros municipios tamaulipecos.
Además, también informó sobre el cierre de las garitas de Matamoros, Ciudad
Victoria, denominadas "Las Yescas", y la garita de la carretera Reynosa-San
Fernando.
Tres puntos de inspección aduaneros en Sonora, la garita Cabullona, la de Nogales y la carretera San Antonio, también cerrarán.
Dijo que era una decisión gubernamental cerrar las garitas del interior, pero ahora también las de la frontera están cerradas para incentivar el comercio internacional y agilizar el tráfico de mercancías.

FIN






Libre cruce por el Km 21 oficial cierre de garita
Detalles Publicado el Sabado 13 de Septiembre de 2014,
Escrito por Cesar Barragan / El Diario

http://www.eldiariodesonora.com.mx/nota.php?nota=37573

Nogales

Desde la mañana de ayer, miles de vehículos han cruzado libremente por la garita Agua Zarca, ubicada en el kilometro 21 de esta frontera, ante el cierre definitivo de este punto de revisión, por parte del Gobierno Federal.

Esto se pudo apreciar desde las 10:30 horas de ayer, cuando personal que labora en dichas instalaciones se retiró del lugar, quedando solo oficiales de Comercio Exterior para el resguardo del inmueble.
Por tal motivo vehículos nacionales, fronterizos y extranjeros, así como de transporte de carga y pasajeros, han tenido libre paso por los carriles externos de la aduana, desviados por una simple línea de conos y cinta de precaución.
En el lugar se tuvo conocimiento de que las oficinas de Banjercito siguen funcionando normalmente y al cien por ciento, para los trámites regulares, pues todo cruce de vehículo debe de realizar sus trámites correspondientes.
"Vehículos extranjeros deben de realizar su importación temporal al país al igual que los fronterizos su internación temporal (180 días en el transcurso por un año)", establece el reglamento.
Por otra parte, de manera oficial no se ha informado si a raíz del cierre de la garita se intensificarán los retenes de Comercio Exterior que se instalan en varios puntos de la carretera rumbo a Hermosillo, mismos que se dan a la tarea de detectar vehículos 'chocolates'.

No sabía del cierre de garita: Administrador
El actual Administrador de la Aduana en Nogales, Rodolfo Aguilera Colón, dijo a través de su secretaria particular que no tenía conocimiento de que alguna garita de Nogales estuviera cerrada.
Momentos después la ejecutiva del funcionario señaló que sería el gobierno federal quien se encargaría de dar a conocer los detalles y de hacer oficial el cierre, pues ellos ignoran tal situación.

FIN




Publicado septiembre 13, 2014, 3:13 am
Llega nuevo administrador de la Aduana
Surtieron cambios los nombramientos de varios titulares de direcciones de Aduanas del SAT en el país, incluyendo Nogales.
Rodolfo Aguilera Colón inicia la nueva era en Nogales con el cierre de garita intermedia

Hiram G. Machi
Nogales, Sonora - Nuevo Día

http://nuevodia.com.mx/seccion/local/llega-nuevo-administrador-de-la-aduana

Cambios recientes en las administraciones de Aduanas en el país surtieron efecto entre los que destacan los nombramientos del nuevo titular en esta ciudad.
La Administración General de Aduanas del SAT, designó a José Julián Dip Leos, como administrador de Aduanas en Tijuana, quien estuvo anteriormente en las administraciones de Colima y Tamaulipas.
Sustituye a González Guilbot quien se desempeñó en el cargo desde el 16 de marzo de 2013. Los cambios se registraron junto con otras plazas del país en los que destacan algunos nombres como: Arturo Alejandro de la Vega, en Mexicali; Roberto Gabriel Vera Azar, en San Luis Río Colorado; Rodolfo Aguilera Colón, de Nogales y Patricio Arturo Elizondo León, del Aeropuerto Internacional de la Ciudad de México, confirmaron autoridades del SAT. Cabe destacar que en esta ciudad, después de la renuncia de Rigoberto Valenzuela Pereyra, fue nombrado Rodolfo Aguilera Colón, así mismo, el que fuera Subadministrador Mario Alberto Rodríguez, ocupó la titularidad en de San Luis Río Colorado.

fin



Publicado septiembre 13, 2014, 3:13 am
Avala Alcalde eliminación de revisión
El Presidente Municipal, Ramón Guzmán Muñoz, avaló el cierre de la garita del kilómetro 21, decretado por el Presidente, Enrique Peña Nieto.
Decretado por el Presidente, Enrique Peña Nieto en Nogales

Redacción
Nogales, Sonora - Nuevo Día

http://nuevodia.com.mx/seccion/local/avala-alcalde-eliminacion-de-revision

El Alcalde, Ramón Guzmán Muñoz, avaló el decreto del Presidente de México, Enrique Peña Nieto, para el cierre de la garita "Agua Zarca" del kilómetro 21, que se ubica en Nogales.
El Presidente Municipal manifestó que esto beneficiará y mejorará la política de internación, ya que agilizará el comercio y el turismo, además, anunció que sólo quedarán las aduanas que están al ingresar a territorio mexicano en la Línea Fronteriza.
"Esto, definitivamente dará competitividad a esta frontera, definitivamente tenía que ocurrir, por eso, desde que se dio a conocer por el Presidente Peña Nieto, en noviembre de 2013, nosotros aplaudimos esta decisión", expresó Guzmán Muñoz.
El Alcalde expresó que también cerrarán en diferentes puntos otras ocho garitas internas, mencionó que pidió al nuevo administrador de la Aduana en Nogales Rodolfo Aguilera Colón platicar en su momento de manera amplia sobre lo que significa este cierre para que la gente sepa todos los detalles sobre esto.
,

fin

Monday, September 8, 2014

AZMEX SPECIAL 9-9-14

AZMEX SPECIAL 9 SEP 2014

Note: La Jornada: Do you believe in the right to defend oneself?
"Society's authority is delegated--all of it. All legitimate authority begins with self-defense, by people who are first willing to do something for ourselves and then for others."

The family has roots in AZ, and a long time in Chih. the Janos and Nuevos Casas Grandes areas. The family has been active in the fight against the drug cartels and corruption.

Comment: So much of this now applies to the U.S. Que triste


From the good folks at Borderland Beat
http://www.borderlandbeat.com

The Movement Goes on; "It's Criminal to Jail Self-Defense Members When Government Fails to Provide Public Security"
Sunday, September 7, 2014 | Borderland Beat Reporter dd
La Jornada: Sanjuana Martínez
Translated by Jane Brundage for Mexican Voices

http://www.borderlandbeat.com

Julian LeBaron, Social Activist

Tragedy changed Julián LeBarón. First his brother and brother-in-law were kidnapped and killed, then his friends and neighbors. He is an activist, a social fighter who does not believe either in the government of Enrique Peña Nieto, or in a system that he considers "criminal" because it does not meet its citizen's needs for freedom, security and prosperity.

LeBarón just arrived in Mexico City from his hometown of Galeana in northwestern Chihuahua. He has spent two months demanding the release of Dr. José Manuel Mireles, whom he regards as a "very decent" man:

"He sacrificed his life to defend his neighbor, something that my brother did and paid for with his life. Arresting him is a direct attack on the most sacred right in the world: the right to defend oneself. Any authority that denies us that right is a criminal authority."

Social Activist
A man of the countryside, a builder of houses and social movements, LeBarón symbolizes the struggle for a change of consciousness in a country where, faced with all kinds of abuse from power, the majority of citizens seem mired in the throes of conformity.

LeBarón first joined the Movement for Peace with Justice and Dignity begun by Javier Sicilia, then began making his own path in solidarity with the noblest causes seeking justice and redress for migrants, disappeared, political prisoners, victims of war:

"Not one person has been sentenced for my brother's murder. I've met thousands of victims, but I haven't seen justice done in a single case." With no fear of being wrong, LeBarón repeats: "Our system is criminal."

LeBaron is tall, sturdy, he wears a cowboy hat; his gaze is firm and direct, like his speech. The interview with La Jornada begins with a question on his part, a question that ultimately throws everybody:
"As a citizen, would you give money voluntarily to government officials in exchange for what you get?"
And he quickly replies: "Until today, I have not found any Mexican who says he would do so voluntarily. This means that originally government was conceived as a way of organizing ourselves in order to do things for the benefit of society. But it isn't that now. Today, the government is a violent, destructive and corrupt tool."

La Jornada: Why has the government become like that?
"Because it does the opposite of what it should do. Government institutions say that they know how to spend the fruit of your labor better than you do. And everyone, because some ignorant and crazy ones made a mark on a piece of paper, put those bits of paper in a box and say they counted those marks, and they have a majority. This means that the government has the right to hire police and armed people and to forbid you to defend yourself. It is a way of imposing their will and taking away the fruits of your labor, even though we may not agree."

La Jornada: It is assumed that this is called the State ...
"I don't know what that means. What is the State? The government and the State are things that do not exist. In reality, they don't work. They are people just like you and me, and we have accepted that the principles of those who govern are differ from ours." "The government is damaging the entire society. And everything that harms a human being is criminal. Our system is criminal."

La Jornada: It is presumed that we live in a democracy ...
"Our elections are secret, and we have allowed this system to perpetuate itself. The President won the election with 18 million votes in a country of 120 million Mexicans. And we don't know who voted, because voting is secret."

La Jornada: Why doesn't the system work?
"If you go and tell a government official, 'I voted for you, but you lied. You haven't done anything you promised'. The official replies that the vote is secret, and he has no way of knowing whether or not you voted for him. "The only thing that is certain is that he has the power for three or six years, and you are in the position of having to obey. If you resist, he kills you or throws you in jail. You decide what you want to do. This is the system that has swallowed us."

La Jornada: Then in Mexico there is no real democracy?
"No. We have accepted a language that distorts reality. The majority decides, but just because it is a majority doesn't give it the right to steal or hurt citizens. Democracy is a great tool for reaching agreements on issues. It is very necessary to have a government in order to organize ourselves, but when the liberty, property and life of an individual are not protected, then we live in a dictatorship."

La Jornada: And what can you do?
"We have to work compassionately as a peaceful society to get respect for the fruit of our labor and for everyone's life. Any authority that prevents the individual from defending himself (which is what self-defense groups were doing in Michoacán), that authority commits a crime. It is treason. If the government does not allow us to defend ourselves, that is a completely criminal government."

La Jornada: Are you still threatened with death?
"Not that I know of."

La Jornada: Are you still struggling for human rights?
"There are people who say they have rights to health, electricity, housing, public security ... then we also have the right to use the police and army to force them to provide us with security. I do not believe in violence of any kind."
La Jornada: And the violence continues ...
"It's a recognized fact that violence in Mexico continues to get worse for everyone. We have reached the point where the citizen knows that the delegated authority is not going to defend him. And the authority does not accept being told what to do. The government has become a dictatorship. We live in a near-absolute dictatorship. A dictatorship over life and property."

La Jornada: That much?
"The people who defend themselves are in jail because they dared to do so when they found no defense in the authority. And we have allowed self-defense members to be treated as if they were criminals."

La Jornada: Do you believe in the right to defend oneself?
"Society's authority is delegated--all of it. All legitimate authority begins with self-defense, by people who are first willing to do something for ourselves and then for others."

La Jornada: Has anything changed with Peña Nieto?
'The basic problem that we have in the country is not the violence: it is fear. If violence doesn't have the power to inspire fear, then it only provokes disgust. We citizens cannot overcome fear by putting more soldiers in the street. That's something that only makes it worse. It is something that has to be done from inside society to organize and resist institutional abuses of power.

A Bleak Future

La Jornada: Is there any future with the reforms in this administration?
"I do not see any future in the presidency of Enrique Peña Nieto, but I am convinced that in the long term, Mexico will be the first country to shake off the drivel of fear.
"The violence is so oppressive that the people are losing their fear. Now it's the only thing that causes adrenaline to rise. That's what happened in Michoacán. The only tools that our system has to establish order are violence and laws."

La Jornada: Have you any hope for change with Enrique Peña Nieto?
"I have no hope that solutions might come from this government. I do not agree with this system. We have more than 150,000 victims. All the evidence is right in front of our faces. We would be fools if we allow the government to continue perpetuating [the violence]."

La Jornada: Why do they kill social activists in Mexico?
"Because they represent a threat to people who do not want to work. It's as simple as that. And they are going to continue killing social activists until consciousness is sufficiently raised for citizens to unite around not allowing that to happen."

La Jornada: Why are social activists considered dangerous?
"Because they are the bearers of a new idea, a different way of doing things."

La Jornada: How are you able to survive as a social activist in Mexico?
'The only way is there are many of us."


END

Friday, September 5, 2014

AZMEX UPDATE 5-9-14

AZMEX UPDATE 5 SEP 2014


5 arrested in kidnapping case; victim treated at hospital
9 hours ago • By Carmen Duarte

http://tucson.com/news/blogs/police-beat/arrested-in-kidnapping-case-victim-treated-at-hospital/article_6bf9336e-33f3-11e4-bfb9-0019bb2963f4.html

A kidnapped teen who was beaten and held for ransom was treated at a hospital Wednesday for non-life threatening injuries.

Five men were taken into custody.

Booked into the Pima County jail were Juan Carlos Martinez-Borajas, 51, on possession of narcotic drugs; Brandon Vega, 19, Jose Pedro Molina-Durgin, 36, Cruz Carrillo, 19, and Jose Angel Reyes-Palomino, 28, each facing kidnapping, extortion and armed robbery.

Martinez-Borajas, who was a passenger in a car that left a south side house while it was under surveillance by police Wednesday, was captured after a high-speed chase into Green Valley where the vehicle crashed into a desert ditch. The crash occurred near South Camino del Sol and West Mission Twin Buttes Road, said Sgt. Pete Dugan, a Tucson Police Department spokesman.

Both Martinez-Borajas and the driver of the vehicle ran after the crash. Authorities did not capture the driver, Dugan said.

The family of the 16-year-old boy received a telephone call Tuesday in which the caller stated the teen was being held. The caller demanded a large amount of money for the teen's return, said Dugan.

The family reported the incident to police and detectives of the home invasion unit began an investigation, which led to the house in the 200 block of West Melridge Street. The neighborhood is near West Drexel Road and South Liberty Avenue.

While the house was under surveillance, officers arrested four men who ran from the house. Police also assisted the teen who ran outside from the house with his hands tied and his face partially blindfolded.

The teen said he was beaten, and that several people had been in the house, and they had guns. The teen also said he heard people saying that there were explosives inside the house, Dugan said.

The Special Weapons and Tactics team and the bomb squad responded to the house to make sure there were no explosive devices on the property. An assault rifle, several handguns and narcotics were found. Several of the guns had been reported stolen, Dugan said.

The Pima County Sheriff's Department, the Arizona Department of Public Safety and Border Patrol assisted police in the case.

Investigators ask that anyone with information call 911 or 88-CRIME.

END




Note: Growing pot north of the border will put the Mexicans out of business. For sure.


Two plead not guilty in pot field case
Posted: Thursday, September 4, 2014 8:45 am
FERNANDO DEL VALLE | STAFF WRITER

http://www.themonitor.com/news/local/two-plead-not-guilty-in-pot-field-case/article_80f7b6e4-34a9-11e4-b7d5-001a4bcf6878.html

BROWNSVILLE — Two Mexican nationals arrested near the largest marijuana field found in Willacy County and a "stash house" that federal agents say was used to hold immigrants pleaded not guilty in separate cases Thursday.

Jury selection is set for Oct. 30 in the cases of Miguel Echevarria-Zuniga, 50, and Israel Santiago-Guzman, 23. Echevarria-Zuniga, who is being held on $25,000 bail, faces up to 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine on a felony charge of re-entering the country on Jan. 19, according to court records.

Records show Echevarria-Zuniga was sentenced to 19 months on a charge of possession with intent to deliver marijuana in 1989 before he was deported in 1990.

Santiago-Guzman, also held on $25,000 bail, faces as much as 15 years in prison and $500,000 in fines on one count of conspiracy to transport immigrants and two counts of transporting immigrants who are in the country illegally, records state.

Both men were arrested Aug. 14 near the remote Willacy County stash house and the marijuana field that had $4.5 million worth of marijuana plants with a street value of $10 million, authorities said.

Agent Bradley Haines, with Homeland Security Investigations, said that Echevarria-Zuniga claimed Santiago-Guzman, described in court records as a "brush guide," had smuggled him and his son Miguel Echevarria-Guizar and a group of immigrants into the United States.

Santiago-Guzman, who denied the claim, led authorities to the stash house off Farm-to-Market Road 490 where he said he was assaulted, records show. Haines said that agents caught 12 immigrants in the country illegally along with Echevarria-Zuniga and his son in the area of the stash house and the marijuana field.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Ignacio Torteya III on Aug. 21 granted Haines' request to search a warehouse at 5200 Mile 10 Rd. in Weslaco rented to Echevarria-Zuniga, records show.

Haines said that he was investigating a possible offense of "conspiracy and possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance," and had reason to believe that the warehouse contained evidence of narcotics and human trafficking. Echevarria-Zuniga's lawyer, Paul Hajjar, said agents have not disclosed findings of their investigation into any link his client has with the Weslaco warehouse.

end

AZMEX ACTIVITY 4-9-14 Fwd: Border Audio - McAllen, Texas - Labor Day Weekend - 159 groups, 1,110 Bodies

Note:  From friend on TEXMEX border.

Begin forwarded message:


Subject: Border Audio - McAllen, Texas - Labor Day Weekend - 159 groups, 1,110 Bodies
Date: September 3, 2014 8:06:32 PM EDT
To: Recipient list suppressed:;


How'd you spend your Labor Day Weekend ??

Here's how they spent it in the Rio Grande Valley .....




 








                                          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Article IV, Section 4 of the US Constitution:




Clearly, what we are witnessing with this massive and uncontrolled influx of
illegal aliens through our southern border is an Invasion of those states that
border the state of Mexico, being consciously facilitated by the United States
Federal Government through its action and inaction.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

OK for Distribution

Border Audio - McAllen, Texas - Labor Day Weekend -  159 groups, 1,110 Bodies

21 Minutes of condensed audio covering the  72 hour period - 8/30/14  thru 9/1/14  (
click on link below)

http://www.secureborderintel.org/BorderBlotter/BorderAudio083014_thru_090114.mp3


Groups of:  2,8,3,10,10,3,3,2,11,7+,11, "46" Drugs, 2,,4,1,1,40,8,4,"Bailout",9,8,17,5,5,3,20,3,4,2,2,3,3,5,3,
3,2,15,30,1,8,4,8,4,8,1, 8,15,"Shots Fired",16,7,24,4,"Bailout"6,5,"46"Drugs,9,12,12,10,3,2,2,2,15,12,20,8,10,
25,7,3,5,15,21,15,21,2,3,1,1,1, 4,4,1,5,3,8,6.6.1,2,2,2,"46"-Drugs,10,5,15,2,7,4,5,15,20,6,8,1,2,1,4,"46" Drugs,
3,3,4,12,1,10,8,10+,8,16,7,1,2,5,3,14 20,3,1,6,5,1,3,4,4,12,"46"-Drugs,5,2,3,4,1,"46"-Drugs,10,10,2,10,10+,
4,9,11,2,13,8,9,20+,9


-Significant Events in Audio:

-- There were MANY groups being worked during this 72 hour period where the size of the group and/or exact location could not be determined.

-- Note: Audio clips are comprised of USBP radio traffic  broadcast "in-the-clear" (un-encrypted) from the busy McAllen Sector.
It is estimated that un-encrypted radio traffic comprises less than 30% of the total activity for any given time period.



72 hour map of USBP activity
(where coordinates were given) - McAllen, Texas - 08/30/14 thru 09/1/14  - 159 Groups, 1,110 bodies

 



FYI :  BORDER PATROL "10-CODES"  (link)

** Border Patrol Jargon **

"46" = drugs.. usually marijuana
"45" = Illegal Aliens
"IAs" = Illegal Aliens
"UDAs" = Illegal Aliens
"UACs" = Unaccompanied Children (Illegal Aliens)
"Bodies" = Illegal Aliens (unless they are really "10-7" (deceased )
"10-7" = Out of Service - unavailable
"10-15" = "in custody"
  "10-97" = Begin transport of juvenile/female
  "10-98" = End transport of juvenile/female
"Packers", "Mules" = drug smugglers
"Bailout" = individuals who abscond from a traffic stop
"Got Aways" - (literally)
"TBS" = turned back south
"POE" = Port of Entry
"The Line" = the US/Mexico International Boundary
"Omaha", "Liberty", Falcon" = Helicopters and Fixed Wing aircraft
"Pushing" = tracking and literally "pushing" behind a group
"USC" = U.S. Citizen
"BOLO" = BE ON THE LOOKOUT
"FTY" = Failure to Yield
  "Whiskey Mikes" = Texas County Constables

  

      http://www.secureborderintel.org/



Wednesday, August 27, 2014

AZMEX UPDATE 27-8-14

AZMEX UPDATE 27 AUG 2014


One month later: gap still in U.S. Mexico border fence from monsoon

Posted: Aug 27, 2014 8:58 AM EDT
Updated: Aug 27, 2014 10:27 AM EDT
By Maria Hechanova - email

Hole in border fence, as of August 27, 2014. (Source: Tucson News Now)


Hole in the border fence as of July 28, 2014. (Source: Tucson News Now)
Vehicle barricades block the hole in the fence (Source: Tucson News Now)

http://www.tucsonnewsnow.com/story/26381929/one-month-later-gap-still-in-us-mexico-border-fence-from-monsoon

NOGALES, AZ (Tucson News Now) - There is still a big gap in the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Nogales, Arizona just west of the Mariposa Port of Entry.

It has been one month since the monsoon dumped a lot of rain in a small area in a short amount of time. The large amount of rushing water crossed the border and drained from Mexico into the U.S. in this area taking the fence down with it.

Tucson Sector U.S. Border Patrol agents say the reason for the delay is because contractors are waiting to fix the fence when the ground is less saturated.

The estimated repair date is still to be determined, though contractors have already assessed the damage and determined how the repairs need to be made.

Weather-related border fence damage does not happen often. According to officials, the last time something like this took place was back in 2011 in Lukeville, in western Pima County.

Right now, agents are continuing to monitor the section of missing fence in Nogales on the ground and with cameras to make sure there is not a security threat or breach. Though according to one BP agent on the scene there have been people trying to cross over into the U.S. via the hole, on foot.

According to agents, it is an already highly visible spot and no extra resources are necessary to keep it safe. Agents already assigned to the area are just keeping a closer eye on it.

The fence, which agents say can range from 18 to 26 feet tall in the area is made of steel, rebar, and concrete and is set deep in the ground. They say it would not make any sense to put the fence up now, because the foundation would not set correctly or hold up well in the next storm.

It is unclear if any modifications will be made to the original design to make the fence stronger or prevent an event like this from happening again. There is also no word yet on how much the repairs will cost.

END




And then this one;

Former Gulf Cartel leader fights for U.S. citizenship
Posted: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 6:29 pm
LAURA B. MARTINEZ | STAFF WRITER

http://www.themonitor.com/news/local/former-gulf-cartel-leader-fights-for-u-s-citizenship/article_cb771d96-2d78-11e4-a9cb-001a4bcf6878.html

Reputed drug kingpin Juan Garcia Abrego is taking the federal government and the state of Texas to court. He wants both agencies to declare him a U.S. citizen.
Although Garcia Abrego claims he was born in Texas, the state and federal governments maintain Garcia Abrego is a Mexican national and that his birth occurred in Matamoros, Mexico.
In October 1996, Garcia Abrego, the original leader of the Gulf Cartel, was found guilty of 22 federal counts that included distributing more than 14 tons of cocaine into the U.S. and laundering more than $10.5 million. He was also ordered to forfeit $350 million to the government.
Garcia Abrego was sentenced to life in prison and is being held at the "SuperMax" federal prison in Florence, Colorado.
According to federal court documents filed last week at a Brownsville federal court, Garcia Abrego wants the government to clarify his status as a U.S. citizen and declare him a citizen of this country.
The documents state Garcia Abrego has tried to get a certified copy of a birth certificate that states he was born Sept. 13, 1944, in La Paloma, Texas.
Court records show that an administrative hearing was held March 13, 2013, regarding the Texas State Register denying Garcia access to a certified copy of the birth certificate "due to information indicating that the certificate was false."
The false birth certificate mentioned in the hearing is one that Garcia Abrego filed in May 1965, labeled as a Texas delayed certificate of birth. It was reportedly filed under the name Juan Garcia.
The state indicates it cannot provide Garcia Abrego with the document declaring him a U.S. citizen because the state has documentation that reveals he was born in Matamoros, records show.
Fred Kowalski, Garcia Abrego's lead attorney, could not be reached for comment Tuesday.
Garcia Abrego was one of the FBI's "Most Wanted," and prosecutors say he was making $2 billion a year before his arrest in January 1996.
In October 1989, Texas Department of Public Safety narcotics officers seized nine tons of cocaine valued at $1 billion outside Harlingen. The drugs were linked to the Garcia Abrego ring.
A pretrial conference on the case has been scheduled for Dec. 2 before U.S. District Judge Andrew S. Hanen.

end

Monday, August 18, 2014

AZMEX UPDATE 16-8-14

Note: As the drug cartels go out of business?

AZMEX UPDATE 16 AUG 2014

Note: much cocaine, heroin and meth

$1.6 million in drugs seized at AZ borders in 6 days
12 hours ago • Kimberly Matas Arizona Daily Star

http://tucson.com/news/blogs/police-beat/million-in-drugs-seized-at-az-borders-in-days/article_c9a0f77a-24dc-11e4-bdc4-001a4bcf887a.html

Police Beat blog
In less than a week border officers have confiscated $1.6 million worth of drugs at Arizona ports of entry.

— Wednesday Edson Omar Flores, 40, of San Luis, was arrested at that port of entry for trying to smuggle more than $70,000 worth of cocaine and methamphetamine into the United States, according to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection news release.

Officers found the drugs after a narcotics detection dog smelled them in the front fender wells of the Oldsmobile sedan Flores was driving.

They found nearly 5 pounds of cocaine worth $47,000, and more than 8 pounds of meth valued at nearly $25,000.

— In separate busts Tuesday, officers at the Nogales port seized more than $186,000 worth of narcotics.

A drug-sniffing dog found nearly 39 pounds of meth worth an estimated $117,000 in both side-walls of a Ford pickup truck bed driven by a 50-year-old man from Hermosillo, Sonora.

Later, officers referred a 32-year-old Tucson woman for further inspection of her Nissan sedan. A drug dog alerted to the flooring of the vehicle where officers found 20 packages of marijuana weighing nearly 139 pounds and worth about $69,000.

— Monday officers made three arrests at two ports and seized $364,000 in narcotics.

Officers at the Nogales port stopped a Toyota sedan driven by a 68-year-old Nogales, Arizona, man and a drug dog hit on a hidden compartment between the front seats. Inside, officers found more than 14 pounds of meth valued in excess of $42,000.

A short time later at the same crossing, officers referred a 49-year-old of Nogales, Sonora, man for further inspection of his Nissan SUV. Again, a drug dog alerted and officers found more than 22 pounds of cocaine worth about $231,000. The drugs were in a non-factory compartment behind the vehicle's airbag. Officers also found a package containing more than 2 pounds of heroin, in excess of $32,000.

That same day, Ramon Conrado Vasquez-Villa, 61, of Coolidge, and 27-year-old Lynda Mara Villa Verdugo, of Mesa, were arrested at the Port of Lukeville when officers found 113 pounds of marijuana in their GMC truck. The drugs were worth an estimated $56,000.

A 73-year-old Coolidge woman also with them was not arrested.

— Sunday evening, officers at the Nogales port searched a GMC SUV driven by a 20-year-old Tucson man and found two packages of heroin, weighing nearly 3 pounds; more than half-a-pound of cocaine; and 25 packages of meth weighing nearly 37 pounds. The combined value of the drugs was more than $160,000.

— On Saturday officers made five drug busts in Nogales.

First they arrested a 39-year-old Mexican man after a drug dog sniffed out 32 pounds of meth worth $96,000 hidden in his Toyota sedan.

Then they arrested a 37-year-old Mexican woman when a drug dog detected narcotics in the suitcases she was carrying across the border. Inside officers found almost $98,000 worth of heroin.

A 24-year-old Glendale woman was arrested Saturday too, after a drug dog alerted officers to nearly 17 pounds of heroin, 8 pounds of meth and 5.5 pounds of cocaine in non-factory compartments above her Suzuki SUV's rear axles. The drugs were worth $321,000.

They also made two pot busts Saturday that totaled almost $90,000.

They found nearly 80 pounds of marijuana within the backseat of a Chevrolet truck driven by a 32-year-old Mexican man. And they found more than 98 pounds of marijuana under the bed of a Ford truck driven by a 25-year-old Mexican man.

— Last Friday drug dogs made two busts at Nogales ports.

In the first, officers found 36 pounds of methamphetamine worth more than $108,000 and nearly 7 pounds of heroin worth more than $98,500 inside the backseats of an Oldsmobile SUV driven by a 20-year-old man from Mexico.

Soon after a 30-year-old Mexican woman tried to cross the border and officers found more than 4 pounds of meth hidden in the crotch of her clothing. The drugs were worth $12,500.

All drugs and vehicles were seized. The suspects were turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Homeland Security Investigations.


END

AZMEX POLICY2 12-8-14

AZMEX POLICY 2 12 AUG 2012

Comment: (A bit harsh and politically incorrect) No, don't think so. Way off target.
BTW, little mention of heroin, meth, etc. which has grown to a very significant problem.
Perhaps more in the way of wishful thinking?

Must also remember the cartels very successful business plans on hostile takeovers.
No doubt to be facilitated by importation of more gang bangers.
Or, is it "children" fleeing law enforcement and rival gangs?

Ending the prohibition of the 1920's ended organized crime? Chicago prime example of not.
Those who have spent time in some of the "producing" lands will remember there was major violence and other problems long before the current "war on drugs". Also for example, in both Afghanistan and Columbia the drug trade funds the murderous insurrections. Not to ignore the cartels funded by the "American" doper.

Does America and the world really need more doper parasites?
Thx



US Marijuana Legalization Already Weakening Mexican Cartels, Violence Expected to Decline
Cathy Reisenwitz | Aug 11, 2014

http://townhall.com/columnists/cathyreisenwitz/2014/08/11/us-marijuana-legalization-already-weakening-mexican-cartels-violence-expected-to-decline-n1876088/page/full

America's first foray into rolling back prohibition 2.0 is barely underway, and already marijuana prices have dropped low enough to convince some cartel farmers in Mexico to abandon the crop. Mere months after two US states legalized marijuana sales, five Nobel Prize-winning economists released a UN report recommending that countries end their war on drugs. It would seem they were onto something. But in order to further decrease drug-trade violence in so-called producer states, the US first needs to legalize marijuana, but then also the US must stop using the UN to pressure producer countries into supply-based drug prohibition.

Latin America is the largest global exporter of cannabis and cocaine. In 2011 the DOJ's now-shuttered National Drug Intelligence Center found that the top cartels controlled the majority of drug trade in marijuana, heroin, and methamphetamine in over 1,000 US cities.

Research into black markets shows that producer countries experience more violence than consumer countries. In essence, the global war on drugs is a UN scheme to shrug drug war costs off rich countries' shoulders and onto poor Latin American countries, with horrifyingly violent results. Much of the recent child migrant crisis is a direct result of children fleeing cartel violence and conscription into criminal gangs.

When drug prices are high, cartels will step up and produce. By keeping demand for cannabis and cocaine high, but supply low, the US in essence forced the Latin America economy to revolve around drugs. Under prohibition, there is no more profitable export. And of course violence proliferates in illegal industries. So in countries where the dominant export is illegal, violence will be endemic.

That's exactly what the five economists found.

Every single one of the 20 cities with the highest murder rates in the world are in Latin America. Half of the top 10 global kidnapping hotspots are Latin American countries. Time magazine reports that the violence in the murder capital of the world, San Pedro Sula, Honduras, is due to the influx of Mexican drug cartels that funnel U.S.-bound drugs through the country. The cartels are also responsible for an increase in "atrocious crimes" like decapitation, usually used against rival gangs.

Ending the Drug Wars describes drug prohibition as "a transfer of the costs of the drug problem from consumer to producer and transit countries." It references a report called Drugs and Democracy: Toward a Paradigm Shift by the Latin American Commission on Drugs and Democracy, headed by former Latin American presidents Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Cesar Gaviria and Ernesto Zedillo found that Latin America's willingness to cave to first-world pressure has had horrific results, including:

A rise in organized crime caused both by the international narcotics trade and by the growing control exercised by criminal groups over domestic markets and territories
A growth in unacceptable levels of drug-related violence affecting the whole of society and, in particular, the poor and the young

The criminalization of politics and the politicization of crime, as well as the proliferation of the linkages between them, as reflected in the infiltration of democratic institutions by organized crime
The corruption of public servants, the judicial system, governments, the political system and, especially the police forces in charge of enforcing law and orders

The 200-percent growth rate of the illegal drug market between 1994 and 2008 explains roughly 25 percent of the current homicide rate in Colombia, according to recent research. That means Colombia sees about 3,800 more homicides per year on average associated with the war on drugs.

But when drug prices drop, the cartels will move onto other schemes. VICE News asked retired federal agent Terry Nelson whether legalization was hurting the cartels. "The cartels are criminal organizations that were making as much as 35-40 percent of their income from marijuana," Nelson said, "They aren't able to move as much cannabis inside the US now."

America, the United Kingdom and other wealthy states are epicenters of demand. Not only do demand states prohibit drug production and sales within their borders, but have traditionally used the UN to bully producer countries to do the same through moves such as the United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances of 1988 or the US annual certification process.

And for what? The report points out that worldwide drug prohibition has succeeded in raising prices on illicit drugs. This may have impacted rates of use in consumer nations. Even if higher prices suppress demand, for which there's little evidence, there is simply no way to look at the worldwide cost of prohibition as being worth that possible outcome.

"There is now a new willingness among certain states, particularly in Latin America, to be vocal about the inherent problems within the system and to try to extricate themselves from the global drug war quagmires," according to Ending the Drug Wars.

Ending the Drug Wars acknowledges the "microeconomic contradictions inherent in the supply-centric model of control." It calls out the UN for trying to "enforce a uniform set of prohibitionist oriented policies often at the expense of other, arguably more effective policies that incorporate broad frameworks of public health and illicit market management."

However, the ultimately unresolvable problem with prohibition is that:

In a world where demand remains relatively constant, suppressing supply can have short-run price effects. However, in a footloose industry like illicit drugs, these price increases incentivise a new rise in supply, via shifting commodity supply chains. This then feeds back into lower prices and an eventual return to a market equilibrium similar to that which existed prior to the supply-reduction intervention.

Fixing this problem might be the most exciting part about ending America's war on cannabis. Prices will continue to drop as American growth flourishes. Get ready for cheap, high-quality weed. And as prices drop and the supply side moves into the white market,cartels will get out of the game. And just as ending alcohol prohibition greatly diminished the size, influence, and brutality of organized crime, so will legalizing weed diminish the size, influence, and brutality of Mexican cartels.

As the epicenters of supply, Latin American countries resemble America's inner cities, wracked with violent crime and corruption. Demand countries, however, resemble America's suburbs, where the size and scope of the violence pales in comparison. Considering the power wielded by rich countries compared with poor ones, it shouldn't be surprising that they'd be successful in using international pressure to turn poor countries into lawless killing fields. What's galling is that they would choose to use their power this way, and get away with it for decades.

Prohibition doesn't work. But the way it doesn't work varies greatly depending on whether a state is primarily a producer or a consumer of illicit substances. Stopping international pressure on producer countries is the first step to a fairer, more effective international approach to drugs.

fin

Friday, August 15, 2014

AZMEX F&F EXTRA 12-8-14

AZMEX F&F EXTRA 12 AUG 2014


An Open Letter to the United States Congress
Jay Dobyns | Aug 11, 2014


http://townhall.com/columnists/jaydobyns/2014/08/11/an-open-letter-to-the-united-states-congress-n1877172?utm_source=thdailypm&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nl_pm

Editor's note: The original version of this column was published on August 10, 2014 at JayDobyns.com.To view ATF investigation documents related to this column, please click here.

To the Honorable Members of the Senate and House of Representatives:

My name is Jay Dobyns. In January of this year, I retired from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms after twenty-seven years of decorated service.

Today is the six-year anniversary of the arson of my home. My wife and two children were inside when the fire was set. They were lucky to escape and survive, although my home and all of our belongings were destroyed by that criminal act.

Leading up to that conclusive and somewhat predictable event, my family and I had already endured years and dozens of credible and validated death and violence threats issued from violent crime suspects and based on my work as an ATF Agent. Each time those events were summarily dismissed by ATF's leadership as unworthy of attention.

After investigating the August 10, 2008, arson, two of the nation's leading arson investigators determined that I was not involved. ATF's leadership, both nationally and locally, ignored the determinations of their own experts and maliciously pursued me as the sole suspect, implicitly categorizing me as an ATF agent willing to murder his own family by fire. The managers and executives involved were known to be corrupt, despised by ATF agents, and among those who planned and implemented ATF's Operation Fast and Furious.

Those mangers ignored real-time investigative leads and true suspects while instead illegally recording my telephone calls and attempting to gather intelligence on me. None was to be found because I was not involved and innocent. One of ATF's investigators, an Agent trusted to investigate the Olympic Park bombing, the Oklahoma City bombing, the Columbine High School massacre, the 9/11 terrorist attack and countless other crime scenes told ATF – "I've investigated Jay, he's clean, let me go find the people who did this."

ATF's manager George Gillett (of Fast and Furious infamy) immediately removed that agent and his partner from the case. Their investigation did not fit his agenda.

ATF intentionally scuttled their investigation before contaminating a hand-off to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Under the guidance of the Department of Justice, the most flagrant destruction of one federal agent's career and reputation ever publicly known took place. Now six years later the trail has gone cold and the real arsonist(s) remain at large having attempted to murder a federal agent and his family without pursuit.

When that conduct was challenged in court, both agencies used every tactic available to them, some illegal, some merely unethical and despicable, to cover-up their conduct. Attorneys for the government were fired for their actions in this case; their bad acts never acknowledged or remedied. The unethical tactics used by the government included the destruction and withholding of critical evidence and providing false sworn testimony at depositions and at trial.

The highest levels of leadership at each of these agencies are fully aware of the truth, yet they continue efforts to ensure it is never exposed. That is the system now firmly entrenched at the United States Department of Justice and at ATF – do anything necessary to do to keep your job, displace blame onto others, and if you must, hide and misrepresent the facts and truth from public and courtroom examination.

I respect the separation of powers between the legislative and judicial branches defined by our Constitution. As I await the findings of the court with patience and hope, I honor those laws. The truth is going to come out, whether ATF, DOJ, and their leaders Eric Holder and B. Todd Jones, care for it or not.

My biggest disappointment is that facts and evidence revealed during my lawsuit have been publicly available and brought to your attention for a considerable amount of time. Our nation's elected officials, appointed Justice Department and ATF leaders, mid-level managers, federal prosecutors, and every internal ethics mechanism within those agencies, just doesn't care.

Those agencies and their leaders have felt no pressure from you on this matter, thus, no inclination to do anything about ATF scuttling the investigation of the attempted murder of an agent and his family, or ATF's calculated effort to place the crime on my shoulders. I say "ATF" because when ATF managers conduct themselves in this manner and ATF executive leadership becomes aware of it yet fails to enact discipline, terminate employment or refer internal crimes for prosecution, then ATF and those executives own and accept those misdeeds as approved methods of operation.

Fortunately, Congress and the judiciary have the power and authority to correct these wrongs. I have faith and confidence that the court will determine what facts are true and render a fair and appropriate conclusion.

But, where is Congress on this? What more is needed? If federal legislators are waiting for the court to put a bow on this situation for them then, in my opinion, you are not fulfilling your duties and passing the buck by displacing your jobs onto the Judge. Evidence is presently available for your attention and action outside of the pending legal proceedings. The court will do their job. Will you? For six years ATF's top brass has acted in the very manner that you publicly criticize them for but, Congress has turned their backs to this situation acting in the exact manner you challenge ATF's leadership for. Attached below is a fraction of the critical information available to you that is not protected by the court. Will you react to it or will hold a double standard; one for your demands of ATF accountability and one for yourselves?

My situation may be unique, in that there was an attempt to murder me and my family, but the nature of cover-up and retaliation that I have suffered is similar to dozens, if not hundreds, of other cases in ATF. As I await the court's resolution of my case, there are clear and decisive measures that Congress can take now to prevent situations like mine from being repeated. To date, none of those have been implemented, and no hearings have been held. DOJ and ATF have been empowered by your exhaustion for seeking the truth. In their eyes, they have won. They have weathered the storm, out-waiting and out-litigating your inquiries.

Given my situation and in the eyes of my family, friends and respected peers, I cannot allow the excuse of frustration or weariness to prevent me from continuing to address this matter, even in retirement.

As evidence of those agencies unchecked brazenness; in May of 2013, one month before the trial regarding my allegations of failure to assist a threatened employee, I was attacked on a commercial airline flight by gang members who recognized me. ATF, the FBI and DOJ once again failed to conduct even the most elementary investigation of that event ignoring the simplest and most basic investigative procedures that would have quickly resulted in arrests and prosecutions. I assume that that they did not react knowing that this new attack on me was outside the scope of the allegations pending before the court and could not be discussed at trial.

I have done all that I can to seek truth, justice and accountability. I am but one man mostly powerless to force or affect change. Please do your part to ensure that no other government employee, no other lawman or woman anywhere, has to suffer the consequences that I have behind their service to America's law enforcement missions.

Respectfully,
Jay Dobyns

FIN

AZMEX POLICY 12-8-14

AZMEX POLICY 12 AUG 2014

Comment: Arivaca is on a main drug and human smuggling route, up along the Altar Valley.
Get a government job and never work again.


Aug 6, 2014 12:26 AM by Tom McNamara and Michel Marizco
N4T Investigators: Arizona holding up law enforcement comm tower on U.S. border

ARIVACA - Arizona has long been a critic of the federal government's slow efforts in securing the U.S.-Mexico border. But now the News 4 Tucson Investigators have discovered that when it comes to a communications tower crucial to law enforcement on the border, it's Arizona that's slowing things down.

Two years ago, Gov. Jan Brewer drew national attention when she waved her finger into President Obama's face. She was pressing him about an earlier meeting where they had talked about the border and illegal immigration.

But now the News 4 Tucson Investigators have learned, when it comes to a stalled communications tower in Southern Arizona, fingers are waving at the state.

Jim Chilton owns a ranch in the small town of Arivaca. More than a year ago, Govnet, a Scottsdale contractor, started building a communications tower here. It's a cellphone tower, the only one in town. But it's also equipped for law enforcement. The signal for police radios in this area is always spotty. And U.S. Border Patrol officials tell him the agency is considering using the tower, too, though there are no official plans to do so.

What's holding it up is a 250-foot trench.

"Well, currently, the tower's been in for over a year. But Govnet did not have permission to dig a trench from the electrical box that I helped them provide on my private land to the tower," Chilton said.

So the tower is up, but it's powered off a cable and Govnet can't fully equip the massive tower.

"You can't put anything else up there because it doesn't have enough power," said Chilton as he hoisted the thick black cable that's currently lying on the ground. "They just got to get the state approval to run the line up to there and it's taken over a year so far."

Chilton and other residents say they need the tower because law enforcement communications are limited in the sweeping mountain ranges that surround Arivaca.

Karen McCoy is vice president of Govnet.

"It's about 250 feet. We have a right of way that is prohibiting us from digging a conduit to have full power to the site at the moment," she said.

McCoy says an archeology report has already been completed. So why the hold up?

"I'm not sure. It's a process. They say they're waiting for their archeology stamp on it for clearance which has already been done and reports are clear. It's just waiting for them to sign off," she said.

Chilton is frustrated.

"The 250-foot right to dig a trench is currently on the cultural archivist's desk," he said. "The report has been made, it has been completed. All he has to do is sign it."

Late Tuesday, State Land Department Legislative Policy Administrator, Bill Boyd, responded to KVOA's repeated inquiries. He said all applicants are told these types of permissions can take up to 12 months and that Govnet started the process last September. He said some clarification needed to be completed and the agency is now moving forward with the approval. The trench is scheduled to be presented to a review committee on August 14.

end

Monday, August 11, 2014

AZMEX F&F EXTRA 11-8-14

AZMEX F&F EXTRA 11 AUG 2014


Note: "sentenced to three years (2008) and deported in April 2009"

Aug 7, 2014 11:55 PM by Lupita Murillo and Michel Marizco

http://www.kvoa.com/news/n4t-investigators-indicted-ringleader-of-crew-that-killed-border-patrol-agent-had-previous-immigration-violations/

N4T Investigators: Indicted ringleader of crew that killed Border Patrol agent had previous immigration violations

TUCSON, ARIZ. – A seventh man was charged with the shooting death of U.S. Border Patrol agent Brian Terry. Rosario Rafael Burboa Alvarez pleaded not guilty Thursday in U.S. District Court in Tucson to charges of first and second degree murder and conspiracy.

According to the indictment filed Wednesday, a grand jury in Tucson accuses Burboa, 30, of recruiting the six men initially charged in Terry's death.

Burboa was already in custody since October 2012 on immigration-related charges when he was charged with Terry's killing. According to charges in a separate federal court case, Burboa was arrested on immigration charges after Border Patrol agents surveilling a ripoff crew encountered him.

He was in the U.S. illegally after he'd been arrested in 2008 in Maricopa County with possession of marijuana with intent to sell. He was sentenced to three years and deported in April 2009.

Terry was part of an elite crew of Border Patrol agents called the Border Patrol Tactical Unit, or BORTAC. In December 2010, the BORTAC team was patrolling an area outside of Nogales, Ariz., called Mesquite Seep, hunting for ripoff crews that assault and rob immigrants and smugglers. According to a FBI warrant filed in June 2012, the team interrupted the ripoff crew and arrested one of its members, Rito Osorio Arellanes.

Two nights later, the remaining members of the crew returned to the area. The agents surprised them. The ripoff crew was armed with rifles. Two of those rifles originated from a Phoenix gunstore and were part of a Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms operation called Fast and Furious. The much-criticized operation was supposed to track where weapons turned up at crime scenes but ATF agents had lost track of hundreds of guns. Two AK-47 variants from that operation were found at Terry's murder scene but a FBI ballistics report failed to link the weapons to the rounds that killed the Border Patrol agent.

Operation Fast and Furious led to the resignation of then-U.S. Attorney Dennis Burke and the reassignment of William Newell, ATF's special agent in charge of the Phoenix office. Attorney General Eric Holder was held in civil contempt of Congress in 2012 after Pres. Obama declared certain details of the operation exempt from release under executive authority.

Terry's cousin, Robert Heyer, spoke with the News 4 Tucson Investigators' Lupita Murillo, Thursday.

"This is great news, the Terry family is very pleased and thankful to the FBI and prosecutors who continue to prosecute this case very aggressively," Heyer said.

Only one man was captured the night of Terry's killing, Manuel Osorio-Arellanes. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 30 years in prison in early 2014. His brother, Rito Osorio, was sentenced to eight years for conspiracy in January 2013.

Lionel Portillo Meza was captured in Mexico and extradited to the U.S. last June.

Ivan Soto Barraza was also captured in Mexico and extradited last July. Jesus Rosario Favela Astorga and Heraclio Osorio Arellanes remain fugitives. All hailed from the Mexican state of Sinaloa with roots, and some with previous criminal records, in Phoenix.

Ben Aguilera, who is representing Burboa, said he does not yet know whether the United States will attempt to draw a connection between Fast and Furious and his client.

Fast and Furious has never been mentioned in any of the court paperwork filed in the various defendant's criminal cases.

FIN

AZMEX F&F EXTRA 11-8-14

AZMEX F&F EXTRA 11 AUG 2014


Note: "sentenced to three years (2008) and deported in April 2009"

Aug 7, 2014 11:55 PM by Lupita Murillo and Michel Marizco

http://www.kvoa.com/news/n4t-investigators-indicted-ringleader-of-crew-that-killed-border-patrol-agent-had-previous-immigration-violations/

N4T Investigators: Indicted ringleader of crew that killed Border Patrol agent had previous immigration violations

TUCSON, ARIZ. – A seventh man was charged with the shooting death of U.S. Border Patrol agent Brian Terry. Rosario Rafael Burboa Alvarez pleaded not guilty Thursday in U.S. District Court in Tucson to charges of first and second degree murder and conspiracy.

According to the indictment filed Wednesday, a grand jury in Tucson accuses Burboa, 30, of recruiting the six men initially charged in Terry's death.

Burboa was already in custody since October 2012 on immigration-related charges when he was charged with Terry's killing. According to charges in a separate federal court case, Burboa was arrested on immigration charges after Border Patrol agents surveilling a ripoff crew encountered him.

He was in the U.S. illegally after he'd been arrested in 2008 in Maricopa County with possession of marijuana with intent to sell. He was sentenced to three years and deported in April 2009.

Terry was part of an elite crew of Border Patrol agents called the Border Patrol Tactical Unit, or BORTAC. In December 2010, the BORTAC team was patrolling an area outside of Nogales, Ariz., called Mesquite Seep, hunting for ripoff crews that assault and rob immigrants and smugglers. According to a FBI warrant filed in June 2012, the team interrupted the ripoff crew and arrested one of its members, Rito Osorio Arellanes.

Two nights later, the remaining members of the crew returned to the area. The agents surprised them. The ripoff crew was armed with rifles. Two of those rifles originated from a Phoenix gunstore and were part of a Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms operation called Fast and Furious. The much-criticized operation was supposed to track where weapons turned up at crime scenes but ATF agents had lost track of hundreds of guns. Two AK-47 variants from that operation were found at Terry's murder scene but a FBI ballistics report failed to link the weapons to the rounds that killed the Border Patrol agent.

Operation Fast and Furious led to the resignation of then-U.S. Attorney Dennis Burke and the reassignment of William Newell, ATF's special agent in charge of the Phoenix office. Attorney General Eric Holder was held in civil contempt of Congress in 2012 after Pres. Obama declared certain details of the operation exempt from release under executive authority.

Terry's cousin, Robert Heyer, spoke with the News 4 Tucson Investigators' Lupita Murillo, Thursday.

"This is great news, the Terry family is very pleased and thankful to the FBI and prosecutors who continue to prosecute this case very aggressively," Heyer said.

Only one man was captured the night of Terry's killing, Manuel Osorio-Arellanes. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 30 years in prison in early 2014. His brother, Rito Osorio, was sentenced to eight years for conspiracy in January 2013.

Lionel Portillo Meza was captured in Mexico and extradited to the U.S. last June.

Ivan Soto Barraza was also captured in Mexico and extradited last July. Jesus Rosario Favela Astorga and Heraclio Osorio Arellanes remain fugitives. All hailed from the Mexican state of Sinaloa with roots, and some with previous criminal records, in Phoenix.

Ben Aguilera, who is representing Burboa, said he does not yet know whether the United States will attempt to draw a connection between Fast and Furious and his client.

Fast and Furious has never been mentioned in any of the court paperwork filed in the various defendant's criminal cases.

FIN

AZMEX I3 8-8-14

AZMEX I3 8 AUG 2014

Note: another report from Homeland Security Today. The "children's crusade" also used to divert resources away from drug runs. Would be very interesting to see the data on the "children", how many young males of gang banger age?


7 Alleged Members Of Human Smuggling Network Arrested In Guatemala
By: Anthony Kimery, Editor-in-Chief
08/07/2014 ( 3:25pm)

http://www.hstoday.us/single-article/7-alleged-members-of-human-smuggling-network-arrested-in-guatemala/ae7283c41c8e33851d517165e0529767.html

Seven alleged members of a suspected human smuggling criminal network linked to multiple human smuggling organizations working along the US and Mexican borders, including Texas and Arizona, were arrested Wednesday in Quetzaltenango by Guatemalan law enforcement officials with the assistance of Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) and Customs and Border Protection.

Two other members of the organization were arrested in Mexican territory, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced Thursday.

The "nine individuals are believed to be key members of a confederation of Central American human smuggling organizations that recruit, organize and transport people, including unaccompanied children, from their points of origin in Central and South America to the United States via Arizona and South Texas," DHS said. "This organization has been directly linked with operations where Guatemalans trying to migrate north died during their journey."

During the investigation, DHS said, "multiple bank accounts used by members of this organization were identified. Account movements add up to over $3 million US dollars.

But this is merely a drop in the bucket. Homeland security officials earlier told Homeland Security Today on background that criminal human trafficking organizations smuggling people from Central America have been reaping "multi-millions."

The sources also said Mexican cartels are involved in these operations – "running them as separate smuggling criminal enterprises," one said, noting "there's hardly no criminal operations through Mexico that the cartels aren't involved in -- it's just too damned lucrative ... especially the running of children and families from Central America. The cartels have actively spread the word that they can come to the US and not be deported."

DHS said in its announcement Thursday that, "The operation leading to the arrests in Guatemala was developed jointly by Guatemala's Ministerio Publico and DHS as a result of an initiative that increased information sharing among law enforcement agencies."

The department said there was close coordination between prosecutors from the Guatemala Ministerio Publico and HSI Guatemala Country Attaché Office in targeting these smuggling networks using Guatemalan human smuggling and money laundering laws.

"In addition to arrests," DHS said, "under Guatemalan law, the HSI Guatemala Country Attaché Office is able to facilitate the seizure of assets and finances, including Guatemalan bank accounts, by the government of Guatemala -- effectively neutralizing the smuggler at the point of origin in Central America."

DHS recently announced an ongoing surge operation in the United States to target and dismantle human smuggling operations. "Less than one month into this three-month operation," the department said, "US officials announced that HSI had arrested 191 smugglers and their associates on criminal charges in the United States. US officials also took more than 450 undocumented people into custody and seized nearly $600,000 US dollars in illicit profits from US bank accounts held by human smuggling and drug trafficking organizations."

DSH said, "Human smugglers have no regard for the value of a human life and view the people they smuggle as an expendable business commodity. Smugglers may separate women from their children as another means of extorting more money and in severe cases, hold their human cargo hostage and demand more money from family members as a means to extort higher fees."

In addition, the department said, "Human smugglers often transport their human cargo -- men, women and children -- through desolate terrain without food or water or in trucks or trailers without any ventilation. They also arrange for their human cargo to be taken to drop-houses under deplorable conditions with no way to communicate with relatives or to notify authorities if there is an emergency. Some smuggled aliens have been beaten or raped."

The individuals arrested in Quetzaltenango were: Antonio Rolando Chavez Paxtor, Maricela Isabel Gonzalez Hernandez, Eliseo Alvarado Gonzalez, Marciano Alvarado Gonzalez, Antonio Adonias Gonzalez Hernandez, Genaro Elias Jimenez and Pablo Arnoldo Gomez-Gonzalez.

The two arrested in Mexico are Douglas Ivan Aguilar-Juarez and Milton Rocael Sebastian Cardona.

END


UPDATED

Women escape kidnappers in Nogales, Sonora
Posted: Friday, August 8, 2014 8:46 am
By Curt Prendergast
Nogales International | 0 comments

http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/women-escape-kidnappers-in-nogales-sonora/article_28595822-1f13-11e4-9e12-001a4bcf887a.html

A woman escaped her captors in Nogales, Sonora last weekend and led police officers to where her sister remained locked in a room.
On the morning of Aug. 2, police officers responded to Las Mesitas restaurant on Obregon Avenue where a 27-year-old Guatemalan woman who was traveling with her 7-month-old son described being held captive, extorted for about $6,500, and escaping the clutches of her kidnappers only moments before speaking to police, according to a Nogales, Sonora police report.
Her 16-year-old sister was still being held against her will, she told the officers, and led them to the Gardenia Hotel on Technological Avenue, where a man she identified as "Mauricio" was holding her sister.
The woman told police she had paid Mauricio 70,000 quetzales (about $6,500), but he demanded another 40,000 quetzales (about $3,700) to free her. If she refused to pay, Mauricio threatened to take her son, so when the opportunity arose, she escaped and went looking for help.
Police officers visited the hotel and saw two men who began to act suspiciously when they realized the police were watching them, according to the police report.
The two men, Luis Arnulfo Carbajal Roblero, 24, and Hubelin Rios Camey, 28, both natives of the southern Mexico state of Chiapas, tried to hide in the hotel but were arrested and taken into custody after the 27-year-old woman identified them as her former captors.
After the arrest, police found the 16-year-old sister in a room inside the hotel and her account of the events agreed with that of her sister. After the 27-year-old sister escaped, the men kept her locked inside the room while they went out to look for her, she told police.
In February, a Honduran man told Nogales, Sonora police he had been held captive in the Colinas de Yaqui area. Officers found him with his hand cuffed and feet tied in front of a beer store. He told officers he had escaped through the window of a nearby home where two men had held him hostage.
He led officers to the residence, where they found a pistol, two machetes, a baseball bat, three rolls of adhesive tape, and two pairs of handcuffs. No arrests were reported.

END