Thursday, July 9, 2015

AZMEX UPDATE 9-7-15

AZMEX UPDATE 9 JUL 2015

Note:  disinformation?  Does BLM not keep records of the agency's weapons?


Land agency: Agent's gun may have been used in pier slaying
 July 8, 2015 @ 10:24 am


SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- The U.S. Bureau of Land Management said Wednesday that it is investigating whether an agent's gun was used in the shooting death of a woman walking on a popular San Francisco pier.



BLM spokeswoman Dana Wilson said the agency is trying to determine who owned the gun and whether it was a personal or service weapon -- the latest twist in a case that has become a flashpoint in the country's debate over immigration.


San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr says the weapon was stolen from a federal agent's car.

Juan Francisco Lopez Sanchez, who has been deported to his native Mexico five times and is suspected of living in the United States illegally, told television news stations that he found the gun on the pier and that it accidentally fired. He pleaded not guilty Tuesday to murder charges in Kathryn Steinle's death.

Steinle, 32, was gunned down last week while strolling with her father along San Francisco's popular waterfront area.

Federal officials transferred Sanchez to San Francisco's jail in March to face a 20-year-old marijuana charge after he completed his latest prison term for entering the country illegally.

The San Francisco sheriff, citing the city's "sanctuary city" policy, released Sanchez in April after prosecutors dropped the drug charge, despite an Immigration and Customs Enforcement request to hold him for federal authorities so deportation proceedings could begin.

He told two television stations who interviewed him in jail that he found the gun used in Steinle's killing wrapped in a shirt on the pedestrian pier she was walking on. Sanchez said the gun went off in his hands, and his public defender, Matt Gonzalez, said Tuesday that the San Francisco woman's death appeared accidental.

The shooting has touched off criticism from leading Republican lawmakers and from top Democrats, including California's U.S. senators.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton told CNN that San Francisco was wrong to ignore the ICE detainer request and release Sanchez from custody.

"The city made a mistake not to deport someone that the federal government strongly felt should be deported," Clinton said.

U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein called on San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee to start cooperating with federal immigration officials who want to deport felons such as Sanchez.

"I strongly believe that an undocumented individual, convicted of multiple felonies and with a detainer request from ICE, should not have been released," Feinstein said.

The mayor's office said it has reached out to Homeland Security officials to determine if there's a way to cooperate while still upholding the city's sanctuary policy.

"Mayor Lee shares the senator's concerns surrounding the nature of Mr. Sanchez's transfer to San Francisco and release," said Christine Falvey, a spokeswoman for the mayor.

U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer said she asked Gov. Jerry Brown if state law was followed in Sanchez's release.

"For decades, I have supported deporting violent criminals, and I have always believed that sanctuary should not be given to felons," Boxer said.

San Francisco Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi has defended Sanchez's release and the city law requiring his office to ignore ICE detainer requests. The sheriff said ICE could have obtained a warrant or court order to keep Sanchez in custody.   "ICE knew where he was," Mirkarimi said Monday.

State and federal Republicans, meanwhile, said they would look into the matter.

Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson, who chairs the Senate's homeland security committee, criticized federal officials and demanded to know why Sanchez was not deported.
"Does that make any sense to you?" Johnson demanded to know at a hearing Tuesday. "Because I'll tell you it doesn't make any sense to the American public."

At Sanchez's arraignment Tuesday, prosecutor Dianna Garcia argued against releasing Sanchez on bail, saying, "This was an act of random violence, shooting an innocent victim in the back."

The judge set bail at $5 million, which Sanchez's public defender said will keep him jailed pending trial.

___
END


Note:  Still would be very interesting to get the data on age and gender of the "children".
Anyone in Congress interested?   Media?   A shortage of "homeboys" in the U.S.?


Few unaccompanied immigrant minors returned to home countries
 CRONKITE NEWS/AUBREY RUMORE | July 8, 2015 @ 10:03 am


WASHINGTON -- Fewer than 2,000 of the 51,000 unaccompanied immigrant children who showed up at the Southwest border last year have been repatriated, a Senate panel was told Tuesday, a pace that critics said may have "incentivized" more migration.

Border officials testified that the number of unaccompanied minors showing up at the Southwest border is less than half of what it was last summer, when a flood of children led to what President Barack Obama called a "humanitarian crisis" at the border.

But members of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee were clearly frustrated by delays in sending those children back home, after administration promises last year to "show these Central American countries we are sending people back."

Failure to do so just creates an incentive for immigrant children to make the dangerous journey to cross the border where "90 percent or more of you will be able to stay," said Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisconsin, the committee chairman.

Witnesses from the departments of Justice and Homeland Security said many of those children face persecution back home and most will qualify for asylum here. But they are caught here waiting for a hearing in backlogged immigration courts to hear their asylum pleas, the officials said.

Sen. Tom Carper, D-Delaware, said that while the "numbers are clearly down" at the border from last year, he said some of the immigrants who showed up then were recently told they might not get a hearing until November 2019.   "Clearly, this is unacceptable," Carper said.

Juan Osuna, the director of the Justice Department's Executive Office for Immigration Review, said immigration courts had a backlog of 449,569 cases pending on May 26, a "101 percent backlog increase over the past five years."   "The immigration court system is facing many challenges," Osuna testified. He said the department is "engaged in a focused process to hire many more immigration judges to adjudicate these cases."

But Carper said the backlog is only part of the problem. The government still has "humanitarian responsibilities to protect the children in our custody" while they're awaiting a court date, he said.

While many children remain, the committee was told that fewer are showing up.

After jumping from 12,000 in 2012 to 23,000 in 2013, the number of unaccompanied children at the border spiked to nearly 58,000 last year, said Philip Miller, assistant director of field operations for Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The number was down to 18,246 through the first three quarters of fiscal 2015, he said.

Johnson blamed the increase directly on the president's 2012 announcement of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a program that delays deportation of immigrants who were brought here illegally as children.   "There's one dramatic event that occurred in 2012 - the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals," Johnson said, adding that while there were many contributing factors, DACA was "the primary cause for that surge."

But Mark Greenberg, an acting assistant secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families, said that violence in their Central American home countries plays a large part in the decision to migrate.

Johnson agreed that violence and threats are an underlying cause, but noted that homicide rates in most Central American countries have actually decreased in recent years. He again pointed to DACA as the cause for the continuing migration.

Whatever the cause, Greenberg said the government is better positioned now than it was last year "to be prepared to provide humanitarian care as rapidly as possible, given the myriad of factors that can impact migration flows."

Johnson concluded by saying the government needs to start making "incremental improvements." He called for a "step-by-step, continuous improvement plan," to address the issue.

end


Note:  close today's AZMEX UPDATE with this stinking story.

Dille: Video shows drug bundles blocking sewer line
Courtesy City of Nogales
Blockage
A video feed shows the blockage in the sewer line. City Manager Shane Dille called it "drug bundles and some sort of rack."
Posted: Tuesday, July 7, 2015 2:34 pm | Updated: 5:34 pm, Tue Jul 7, 2015.
By Manuel C. Coppola 
Nogales International

The plug in the cross-border sewer line that caused a home on Morley Avenue to flood with up to three feet of raw sewage appears on video footage to be drug bundles, City Manager Shane Dille said Tuesday.
"We were able to capture video inside the IOI and determined that what was blocking the line were drug bundles and some sort of rack" possibly used to try to haul the bundles out of the pipe, Dille said.
In an 8 a.m. interview on Tuesday at the home on 470 N. Morley Ave., Dille explained that crews were cutting out a section of the street asphalt to clear the pipe and conduct repairs on the International Outflow Interceptor (IOI), as the sewer line is called. He also gave a reporter an exclusive look inside the home just south of the Nogales Clinic.

The walls still had the markings indicating the depth the sewer water reached inside the home. The opening to a tunnel that led to a concrete-boxed area of the Nogales Wash was visible in the corner of the living room.
Officials believe the tunnel was dug for the purpose of extracting drugs being smuggled across the border through the sewer line, but the culprits damaged the pipe in the process.
Dille pointed to oxygen tanks and what appeared to be a hose used to pump air into the tunnel as further evidence of the illicit activity. A drill was discovered as well.
The home first flooded on Sunday afternoon, and while city officials immediately suspected the problem was caused by smuggling activity, conditions at the scene made investigation difficult.

The U.S. Border Patrol, which generally handles drug-tunnel discoveries in Nogales, has yet to issue a statement on the incident.

Crews blocked the pipe at a manhole upstream and diverted the sewer into the Nogales Wash, which is damned near Hohokam Drive so that the sewage water drains back into the IOI. The line runs along the Nogales Wash and carries at least 10 million gallons of sewage per day from Mexico to the Nogales International Wastewater Treatment Plant in Rio Rico.

Video footage on Tuesday also pinpointed an 18-inch breach in the pipe near the tunnel, Dille said. Material is on order and expected to arrive Wednesday morning to affix a "sleeve" over the hole to stop the leak. He said he hopes the line repair to be completed by Wednesday. Repaving will probably not be completed until Thursday.
Meanwhile, the neighboring Nogales Clinic at Morley Avenue and La Castellana Drive remained open. Patients were detouring up through East Adams Street and down to La Castellana to get to their appointments on Tuesday.

end



Wednesday, July 8, 2015

AZMEX UPDATE 8-7-15

AZMEX UPDATE 8 JUL 2015

Note:  Will be very interesting to see how, or if, this one is prosecuted.   Several fed and AZ laws could be used.  

4 facing drug, weapons charges after traffic stop near Rimrock
Posted: Jul 08, 2015 6:13 AM CEST
Updated: Jul 08, 2015 7:50 AM CEST
By Catherine Holland 

Robert Gorman, 33 (Source: Yavapai County Sheriff's Office)
Alyssa Martinez, 27 (Source: Yavapai County Sheriff's Office)
Danica Trujillo, 25 (Source: Yavapai County Sheriff's Office) 
Jessie Gutierrez, 27 (Source: Yavapai County Sheriff's Office)

RIMROCK, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) -
Four people are facing a variety of drug and weapons charges after a deputy with the Yavapai County Sheriff's Office stopped their vehicle on Interstate 17 near Rimrock last week.

According to YCSO, the deputy initially stopped the sedan for equipment and moving violations.

After discovering multiple weapons and drugs, including 0.5 pound of meth, deputies arrested Jessie Gutierrez, 27; Robert Gorman, 33; Alyssa Martinez, 27; and Danica Trujillo, 25. 
Gutierrez, Gorman and Martinez are from Mexico. Trujillo is an Arizona resident.

Deputies became suspicious while talking to Trujillo, who was driving the car.

"During the conversation, Trujillo exhibited abnormal nervousness and Gutierrez Gorman Martinez Trujillo had a hard time identifying her passengers," according to YCSO. Deputies later learned that Trujillo was wants on a drug possession warrant out of New Mexico.

Trujillo claimed Gutierrez was the owner of the car.

Deputies said Gutierrez pretended to be asleep in the front seat and then claimed not to have the ownership documentation for the sedan.

"When the deputy directed him to exit the vehicle, Gutierrez refused and began digging around his seat," according to YCSO. "Sensing he might be reaching for a weapon, the occupants were held at gunpoint and eventually removed with the assistance of additional deputies."

While searching the car, deputies discovered a loaded 9mm handgun stuffed between the seat and the front console, as well a  bag of marijuana and a container of meth in the console.

In the back seat, they found a plastic bag of meth and a syringe with what appeared to be meth residue.

Moving on to the truck, deputies recovered five more weapons, including two semi-automatic rifles and a sawed-off rifle. There also were nearly 1,000 rounds of ammunition, as well as a bullet proof vest and more drugs and drug paraphernalia.

YCSO said the investigation into the suspects' activities is ongoing.

Rimrock is about 90 minutes north of Phoenix.




UPDATES on SF murder   Also reported that the firearm belonged to a fed agent.   Unknown at this time which fed agency, or if the firearm will get the death penalty.  Boots, anti-nausea drug, or stiff drink  suggested for many of the quotes in next two stories.   "Accidental"  


A look at release of the immigrant charged in pier killing
By AMY TAXIN and JANIE HAR
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - The city of San Francisco has come under fire after it released Juan Francisco Lopez Sanchez, a Mexican immigrant in the country illegally, despite a request by federal immigration authorities to keep him in custody so they could deport him for a sixth time.

Sanchez, who has four prior felony drug convictions, is now charged with murder in the killing last week of a woman at a city pier. He has pleaded not guilty.

San Francisco does not honor requests from immigration authorities to hold individuals in custody. The city is one of dozens of communities in the nation that don't fully cooperate with federal immigration authorities on the requests known as detainers, which are used to hold arrestees once their criminal cases have concluded so officials can seek to deport them.

Here are some things to know about the case:

WHY WAS SANCHEZ IN THE SAN FRANCISCO JAIL?

Sanchez pleaded guilty in 2011 to illegally re-entering the U.S. after having been deported and was sentenced to 46 months in federal prison. He was finishing up his sentence when he was turned over in March to the San Francisco Sheriff's Department on a two-decades-old drug charge.

HOW DID SANCHEZ GET RELEASED?

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement issued a detainer asking San Francisco authorities to keep Sanchez in custody so he could be deported again after the drug case was resolved. The detainer was issued, immigration authorities say, because immigration violations are administrative, not criminal.

San Francisco Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi said his office routinely ignores the detainers unless they are backed by an active arrest warrant. He said ICE was aware of San Francisco's policy. Sanchez was released after prosecutors eventually dismissed the drug case because it was so old and involved a small amount of marijuana.

WHY DON'T SOME JURISDICTIONS FULLY COMPLY WITH IMMIGRATION DETAINERS?

Many jurisdictions believe the detainers erode police relations with immigrant communities by making people reluctant to report crimes. The criticism increased after the federal government rolled out its Secure Communities program giving immigration agents access to information about arrestees booked into local jails.

Advocates rallied against the program when some immigrants found themselves facing deportation after being arrested on minor charges, and California passed a law limiting when detainers could be honored.

Last year, a number of jurisdictions stopped releasing arrestees to ICE altogether after a federal court ruling in Oregon found a woman's rights were violated when she was held in jail without probable cause.

WHAT IS AN IMMIGRATION DETAINER?

Detainers call for a law enforcement agency to hold people for as long as 48 hours beyond their release date until they can be picked up by ICE. Since some agencies have stopped honoring the detainers, ICE has started asking in some instances for notification by police when arrestees are going to be released.

The agency has also said it will focus on detaining immigrants who are convicted of serious crimes or pose a threat to public safety.


AP Source: US agent's gun used in San Francisco pier slaying
By PAUL ELIAS
Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - A law enforcement official says the weapon used in the shooting death of a woman on a San Francisco pier belonged to a federal agent - the latest twist in a case that has become a flashpoint in the country's debate over immigration.

The official, who had been briefed on the matter, said Tuesday that a check of the gun's serial number shows it belonged to a federal agent.

The official - who was not authorized to speak publicly about the case and spoke on condition of anonymity - declined to elaborate.

The San Francisco Police Department, which is investigating the case, refused to comment on the disclosure.

The suspected gunman, Juan Francisco Lopez Sanchez, has been deported to his native Mexico five times and is suspected of living in the United States illegally when Kathryn Steinle, 32, was gunned down last week while on an evening stroll with her father along San Francisco's popular waterfront area.

Federal officials transferred Sanchez to San Francisco's jail in March to face a 20-year-old marijuana charge after Sanchez completed his latest prison term for illegally entering the country.

The San Francisco sheriff, citing the city's "sanctuary city" policy, released Sanchez in April after prosecutors dropped the drug charge, despite an Immigration and Customs Enforcement request to hold him for federal authorities so deportation proceedings could begin.

Sanchez pleaded not guilty Tuesday to first-degree murder.

He told two television stations who interviewed him in jail that he found the gun used in Steinle's killing wrapped in a shirt on the pedestrian pier she was walking on. Sanchez said the gun went off in his hands, and his public defender, Matt Gonzalez, said Tuesday that the San Francisco woman's death appeared accidental.

Regardless of the reason behind Steinle's death, the shooting has touched off criticism from leading Republican lawmakers - and from top Democrats, including both of California's U.S. senators.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton told CNN that San Francisco was wrong to ignore the ICE detainer request and release Sanchez from custody.
"The city made a mistake, not to deport someone that the federal government strongly felt should be deported," Clinton said.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein called on San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee to start cooperating with federal immigration officials who want to deport felons such as Sanchez.
"I strongly believe that an undocumented individual, convicted of multiple felonies and with a detainer request from ICE, should not have been released," Feinstein said.

The mayor's office said it has reached out to Homeland Security officials to determine if there's a way to cooperate while still upholding the city's sanctuary policy.   "Mayor Lee shares the senator's concerns surrounding the nature of Mr. Sanchez's transfer to San Francisco and release," said Christine Falvey, a spokeswoman for the mayor.

Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer, also from Northern California, said she asked Gov. Jerry Brown if state law was followed in Sanchez's release.   "For decades, I have supported deporting violent criminals, and I have always believed that sanctuary should not be given to felons," Boxer said.

San Francisco Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi has defended Sanchez's release and the city law requiring it to ignore ICE detainer requests. The sheriff said ICE could have obtained a warrant or court order to keep Sanchez in custody.   "ICE knew where he was," Mirkarimi said Monday.

State and federal Republicans, meanwhile, said they would look into the matter.

Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson, who chairs the Senate's homeland security committee, criticized federal officials and demanded to know why Sanchez was not deported.
"Does that make any sense to you?" Johnson demanded to know at a hearing Tuesday. "Because I'll tell you it doesn't make any sense to the American public."

Republican state Sen. Jeff Stone said he would introduce legislation in Sacramento to require cities to comply with ICE detainer requests.

At Sanchez's arraignment Tuesday, prosecutor Dianna Garcia argued against releasing Sanchez on bail, saying, "This was an act of random violence, shooting an innocent victim in the back."

The judge set bail at $5 million, which Gonzalez said will keep Sanchez jailed pending trial.


More:  






Note:  Winner of this week's Pravda Prize. 

Texas Man On Probation Arrested In Fatal Shooting Of Woman At San Francisco Pier 14
July 2, 2015 4:34 PM

SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — A man has been arrested in the shooting death of a woman who was walking along San Francisco's Embarcadero with her family Wednesday evening.
Texas resident Francisco Sanchez had been detained as a person of interest south along the Embarcadero shortly after the shooting at Pier 14 after witnesses on the pier snapped his photo, which was quickly forwarded to officers investigating the killing.


UPDATE: Man Arrested In Fatal Shooting Of Woman At SF Pier 14 Had Been Deported 5 Times
Sanchez was arrested Thursday. He is 45 or 46 years old and on probation out of Texas.


Sources told KPIX 5 that police divers Thursday recovered a weapon from the black, silty bay waters just off the Embarcadero. It was not clear whether it was the weapon used in the killing.

The victim was identified as 32-year-old Kathryn Steinle, who had recently moved to San Francisco. Police said Steinle suffered a single gunshot wound to her torso and that the shooting appeared to be completely random.

"There were no words exchanged between the suspect and the victim," said Sgt. Michael Andraychak. "The victim said something to her family members to the extent that she didn't feel well, that she just realized something had taken place and she fell to the ground."
Her brother, Brad Steinle, said she was simply walking with her father along the busy tourist locale when she was shot.
Her father and bystanders tried to perform CPR on her, police said, but she was pronounced dead at San Francisco General Hospital about two hours after the shooting.

Steinle was from Pleasanton and a graduate of Amador Valley High School who had moved to San Francisco to work for medical technology firm Medtronic. She is survived by her parents and her brother.
"She was the most wonderful, loving caring person and if anybody could take anything from this — if you love somebody, just tell them that you love them," said brother Brad Steinle.

Andraychak said the Steinle family wanted the police department to relay a message to the public, expressing their gratitude to all the Good Samaritans who tried to help their daughter following the shooting and to all those who provided police with information about the suspect.


END  


Saturday, July 4, 2015

AZMEX SPECIAL 4-7-15

AZMEX SPECIAL 4 JUL 2015

Note:  Appeared on AOL of all places.  In CA, he must have passed the UBC to have obtained a firearm?
"San Francisco is a sanctuary city and local money cannot be spent to cooperate with federal immigration law."  Also, SEVEN felony convictions - why wasn't he still in prison?  


San Francisco: No 'legal basis' to hold shooting suspect
The Associated PressAPJ
Jul 3rd 2015 8:32PM



SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A man suspected in the shooting death of a woman at a busy San Francisco tourist destination has seven felony convictions and has been deported five times, most recently in 2009, a federal agency said Friday.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement had turned Francisco Sanchez over to San Francisco police March 26 on an outstanding drug warrant, agency spokeswoman Virginia Kice said.
Officers arrested Francisco Sanchez on about an hour after Wednesday's seemingly random slaying of Kathryn Steinle at Pier 14 — one of the busiest attractions in the city. People gather there to take in the views, joggers exercise, and families push strollers at all hours.

Sanchez was on probation for an unspecified conviction, police Sgt. Michael Andraychak said Thursday.
Kice said ICE issued a detainer for Sanchez in March, requesting to be notified if he was going to be released. The detainer was not honored, she said.

Freya Horne, counsel for the sheriff's office, said Friday that federal detention orders are not a "legal basis" to hold someone, so Sanchez was released April 15. San Francisco is a sanctuary city and local money cannot be spent to cooperate with federal immigration law.

The city does not turn over people who are in the country illegally unless there's an active warrant for their arrest, she said. Horne said they checked and found none. ICE could have issued an active warrant if they wanted the city to keep him, she said.

"It's not legal to hold someone on a request to detain. This is not just us. This is a widely adopted position," Horne said.

Steinle was gunned down while out for an evening stroll with her father along the waterfront. Police said witnesses heard no argument or dispute before the shooting, suggesting it was a random attack.
Liz Sullivan told the San Francisco Chronicle (http://bit.ly/1IuWbKw) the killing of her daughter was unbelievable and surreal. "I don't think I've totally grasped it," Sullivan said.

Police Sgt. Michael Andraychak said witnesses snapped photos of Sanchez immediately after the shooting, and the images helped police make the arrest while he was walking on a sidewalk a few blocks away.
Police were still waiting for fingerprint identification on Sanchez, who is believed to be a 45-year-old whose last address was in Texas. Authorities said he does not yet have a lawyer who could be reached for comment.

Sullivan told the Chronicle that her 32-year-old daughter turned to her father after she was shot and said she didn't feel well before collapsing.
"She just kept saying, 'Dad, help me, help me,' " Sullivan said.
Her father immediately began CPR before paramedics rushed the woman to the hospital. "She fought for her life," Sullivan said.
Steinle went to high school and previously lived about 40 miles east of San Francisco, the newspaper said. She recently moved just blocks from the waterfront and worked for a medical technology company.
___
This story has been corrected to show the shooting happened Wednesday instead of Thursday.

end

Friday, July 3, 2015

[FWD: What_They're_Saying_About_my_Bill_to_End_Catch_and_Release]



-------- Original Message --------
Subject: What_They're_Saying_About_my_Bill_to_End_Catch_and_Release
From: "Representative Matt Salmon" <AZ05MSIMA@mail.house.gov>
Date: Thu, July 02, 2015 2:16 pm


       
In Case You Missed It
Click here to open this e-mail in its own browser window Click here to open a plain text version of this email

Dear Friend,
This week I was honored to announce a new bill I've introduced to honor Grant Ronnebeck, the 21-year-old clerk who was murdered in cold blood by an illegal immigrant in Mesa earlier this year.  Apolinar Altamirano, his murderer, was a convicted felon released by ICE.
Grant's Law would require the Department of Homeland Security to detain any alien who is unlawfully present in the United States and is arrested for criminal offenses which would render them inadmissible or deportable.  It would also mandate completion of their removal proceedings within 90 days.
In case you missed it, please take a look at this opinion piece by an Arizona Republic Columnist and let me know your thoughts.  Nothing we do can bring Grant back, but we can require that the President's broken Catch-and-Release policy stop.
Matt

Salmon's immigration bill a fitting answer to tragedy
by Laurie Roberts, The Republic | azcentral.com
Rep. Matt Salmon has introduced a bill that would bar federal authorities from releasing undocumented immigrants who have been accused or convicted of serious crimes.

And he wants them deported within 90 days.

The fact that we need legislation to accomplish this is astonishing.

But apparently we do.

Just ask Steve Ronnebeck. His 21-year-old son, Grant, was killed in January over a pack of cigarettes. Apolinar Altamirano – a convicted felon allowed by Immigration and Customs Enforcement to walk the streets for TWO YEARS while awaiting deportation – now stands accused of Grant Ronnebeck's murder.

This didn't need to happen. It shouldn't have happened.

More: Salmon pitches bill to detain immigrants accused or convicted of serious crimes

Altamirano had been arrested in August 2012 after a home invasion in which a woman said she was kidnapped and sexually assaulted. The Maricopa County Attorney's Office allowed him to plead guilty to a low-level burglary. He was sentenced to two years' probation and in January 2013 was turned over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Four days later, ICE released him on a $10,000 bond, to await his deportation hearing.

It didn't matter that he was a felon. It didn't matter that two orders of protection were filed against him, including one from a woman who said he's threatened to kill her and pointed a gun at her boyfriend.

But it mattered greatly to the Ronenbeck family. They just didn't know it until 4 a.m. on Jan. 22. Police say Altamirano walked into a Mesa QuikTrip, dumped a jar of change on the counter and demanded a pack of cigarettes. When Grant wasn't quick enough to comply, he was murdered. The gunman then stepped over Grant's body to grab two packs of cigarettes and left.

Grant Ronnebeck isn't the only victim of federal incompetence. Between 2010 and 2014, the Department of Homeland Security admits that 121 undocumented immigrants who committed crimes and were released while awaiting deportation went on to kill someone – or at least be charged with some form of homicide.

Altamirano makes 122.

The Obama administration has said deportation of criminals is its highest priority yet more than 66,000 convicted felons awaiting deportation were released by ICE in fiscal 2013 and 2014, according to DHS.

Meanwhile, the immigration courts are swamped. Arizona has the eighth largest backlog of pending deportation cases, with an average wait time of 695 days, according to Syracuse University's Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse.

Grant Ronnebeck died on Day 749 of Altamirano's wait.

Steve Ronnebeck is hoping that the sacrifice of his son might prompt our leaders to finally do something.

Salmon's bill – Grant's law, he's calling it – would end the "catch and release" policy that allows the Altamiranos of the world to walk free and it would require deportation within 90 days.

Presumably it comes along with the hefty infusion of resources clearly needed for the court system.

But surely this is something that both Democrats and Republicans can agree that we need to do.

To figure out a way to hold serious criminals who weren't supposed to be here in the first place. To figure out a way to quickly deport them and then to keep them out.

Tragically, the only way to get Altamirano off the streets was over Grant Ronnebeck's dead body. How many more Grants must there be before our leaders fix this?
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Friday, June 19, 2015

AZMEX EXTRA 19-6-15

AZMEX EXTRA 19 JUN 2015

Note:  The big time and the small time.  Would be interesting to learn where the Barrett, if it really is one, came from.  Very little chance of getting the useful details, make, model, and s/n.  Puerto Penasco, AKA "Rocky Point" is a major turist destination a short drive south of AZ. 


Seize weapons, one Barret .50  and armored cars
Details Published on Friday June 19, 2015,
Written by Drafting / The Journal


Puerto Penasco.

The Attorney General's Office (PGR), through the Criminal Investigation Agency (AIC) and the Deputy Regional Control, Criminal Proceedings and Amparo, through its Delegation in Sonora, recovered different weapons in a search warrant, held in a home in the colony Luis Donaldo Colosio in Puerto Penasco.

Derived from an investigation of a crime against health, against person or persons responsible, the operation was authorized by the Federal Seventh Criminal Judge, specializing in searches, investigations,  and Intervention Communications, residing in Mexico, Federal District.

With support from elements of the AIC and the Secretariat of National Defense (SEDENA), the prosecutor of the Federation said six  AK-47's, better known as "goat horn;  and a Barret .50 caliber rifle.

Also, two 50 caliber magazines, and 8 boxes of cartridges for the same caliber.; six handguns;  a grenade, two armored vehicles and a Ford pickup.


END



PEI stops two individuals in possession of firearms
Details Published on Friday June 19, 2015,
Written by Drafting / El Diario 


Bácum.

They confiscated a stolen motorcycle, drugs and  also accused them of rape.
They derived from a complaint of rape and illegal deprivation of liberty, elements of the State Police Investigator of the operational base of Bácum arrested two individuals in possession of firearms, drugs and a motorcycle with theft report.
It is Carlos Alberto Galaviz Corrales and Gilberto López Castro, 27 and 29 years respectively; both domiciled in this population.
The arrest of these individuals was conducted by elements of the PEI after they received an order of investigation rotated by the Deputy Public Prosecutor's Office which stemmed from a complaint filed by a 19 years old on June 12 in which it stated that the detainees had now deprived of freedom and that one of them had sexually abused her.

So after carrying out intelligence work and research, on Monday June 15, around 15:30 hours, the agents placed the detainees today Boulevard Rodolfo Felix Valdez and Constitution Street when observing a motorcycle, which had been reported stolen in Bácum.

Noting the presence of the agents,  Gilberto  and Carlos Alberto tried to flee but were caught meters ahead. On performing a search found Gilberto, had tucked at the waist, a .45 caliber with with four rounds of ammunition and a bullet in the chamber. As well as seven envelopes containing marijuana and 250 pesos, proceeds from the sale of the drug. 

Meanwhile with Carlos Alberto they found a backpack inside which carried a .357 caliber revolver with a cartridge in the cylinder; plus 11 transparent plastic wrappers containing marijuana and 950 pesos, proceeds from the sale of that grass.

The detainees, motorcycles, drugs, firearms and money were put at the disposal of the Public Prosecutor's Office, who yesterday the appropriated within the period required by law, for crimes against health in the form of drug dealing in their conduct of possession of marijuana for the purpose of trade.

Likewise, the Social Representative of appeared before a judge and requested an arrest warrant on charges of rape and unlawful imprisonment. Also, to the Public Prosecutor's Office for the carrying of firearms.

end

Sunday, June 14, 2015

AZMEX UPDATE 14-6-15

AZMEX UPDATE 14 JUN 2015 

Note:  AZMEX UPDATES will continue to be intermittent for some time.

Note:  The area has been contested for some time now, with sometimes daily recoveries of bodies.
Not to mention those not found, on both sides of the border, as body count is underreported.  Unusual to get this kind of reporting in english language U.S. media.  Quite a few young dudes from Sinaloa have met an early end here in northern Sonora.   Some might remember the battle of Tubatuma, just about five years ago now, with a couple dozen dead.  
thx


Fear grips Sonoyta: Shootouts plague Sonora border town
Kelly Presnell / Arizona Daily Star
Juan Ortega in the snack stand outside his home in Desierto de Sonora. During one shootout, he and his wife hid under their bed.
7 hours ago  •  By Perla Trevizo


By the numbers (2015 through June 9)

38: Number of homicides in Sonoyta area

14: Number of homicides in Caborca area

May: Deadliest month so far in Sonoyta with 15 homicides.

May 1: Deadliest day with six people killed in the area of Sonoyta.

Source: Data based on Sonora state investigative police news releases.

SONOYTA, Sonora — Anabel Cortez is afraid to leave her children home alone anymore.

After deadly gunbattles between rival organized crime groups started on April 30, Cortez took her children and fled her rural community outside this border town.

She is back home now that the violence has subsided, but not by choice.

"Where else am I going to go?" asks the mom of three elementary- and middle-school students.

Sonoyta and the rural communities to the east, all part of the municipality of Plutarco Elias Calles, have been the battleground for rival cartel factions vying to control valuable territory for moving people and drugs into the United States.

Sonoyta borders Lukeville, a crossing frequently used by Arizona travelers on their way to the beach town of Puerto Peñasco, commonly known as Rocky Point.

Cortez, 34, was among hundreds of people who fled Desierto de Sonora, less than 10 miles east of Sonoyta, after violence erupted last month. By some accounts, 28 gunmen and two innocent civilians were killed in the Sonoyta area from April 30 to May 5. The Sonora investigative state police reported six people killed on May 1 and another five on May 4. Residents said the criminals themselves started to warn people of upcoming shootouts and asked them to leave.

The fighting nearly paralyzed the town. Many parents stopped sending their kids to school. The city canceled all cultural and sports activities, including the traditional Fiesta de las Flores, an annual fair that is one of Sonoyta's main events.

"We didn't want to put citizens in danger in case of a violent incident, that we would be caught in the crossfire," said Carlos Arvizu, Sonoyta's city manager. "It was a preventive measure."

The mayor, Julio Cesar Ramírez Vásquez, is no longer giving interviews, his office said, after one of the groups threatened him for speaking out.

So far this year, the Sonora state police have reported 38 homicides just in the Sonoyta area — with a population of about 18,000 — and another five wounded. May was the deadliest month, with 15 dead and another one injured, Sonora police data analyzed by the Arizona Daily Star show.

And those are just the officially reported numbers. By other accounts, it was 22 dead — including six burned bodies — and at least a handful of others injured that month. There also have been gunbattles between Sonora state police and gunmen that resulted in at least another 14 dead.

Local residents talk of many others who are missing and unaccounted for.

Another 14 people have died in neighboring Caborca, plus 11 injured — including four state police officers.

Most recently, more than a dozen Central American immigrants were rescued near a ranch on the town's outskirts, close to the U.S. border. State police reported three dead, including two men found inside torched vehicles and a woman with gunshot wounds.

"From what we can tell, migrants were using one of the drug routes," said Erica Curry, a Phoenix spokeswoman with the Drug Enforcement Administration. "We believe they were attacked because drug traffickers don't want that kind of attention."

Then, on June 8, a former municipal police officer and lawyer was murdered by gunmen outside the Circle K in Sonoyta.

BATTLING FOR CONTROL

The recent violence across the border is due to fighting between cells of the Sinaloa cartel known as Los Memos and Los Salazar.

Violence in the Sonoyta area began to spike in January over Los Memos' attempt to take control over the Sonoyta plaza and all drug smuggling routes. It's the most intense fighting since early 2009, when 12 dismembered bodies were found in an abandoned vehicle along the Caborca-Sonoyta highway, with a narco message saying the Sinaloa Cartel was taking over the plaza.

The latest round started in March, Curry said. The Sonora state police reported 10 deaths in the Sonoyta area that month, including a soldier who was patrolling a rural area when he and his partner — who survived — came under attack.

The Sinaloa Cartel has decentralized over the past few years, leading to sporadic, violent power struggles between plaza bosses in northern Sonora, said Tristan Reed, a security analyst for the Austin-based global intelligence firm Stratfor. Also, several top leaders of the cartel were arrested, creating a power vacuum.

On Sept. 6, 2012, Mexican police arrested Adelmo Niebla González, the suspected leader of Los Memos and presumed to be in charge of bringing weapons into Mexico and transporting marijuana, meth and cocaine from Sonora to Maricopa County. El Memos came to power with help from Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán, the head of the Sinaloa Cartel who was arrested in February 2014. He and his two bodyguards escaped a Sinaloa prison in 2014 through a tunnel that was dug into the prison from the outside.

A few months after that arrest, in November 2012, Mexican soldiers arrested Jesús Alfredo Salazar Ramírez, the leader of Los Salazar, in the state of Mexico. Salazar, who came to power after his father was arrested in 2011, was said to be responsible for cultivating, transporting and smuggling marijuana through Sonora and a western sliver of Chihuahua into the United States. He was also an important lieutenant of El Chapo Guzmán.

In 2013, Puerto Peñasco was the scene of an hours-long battle between drug cartel gunmen and the Mexican federal police, who allegedly killed Gonzalo Inzunza, a top lieutenant of the Sinaloa Cartel also known as "El Macho Prieto." The body was never recovered.

"Macho Prieto was involved in one of the first signs of Sinaloa infighting we are still seeing going on," Reed said.

Sonora has always been a key place for traffickers. To the south and east, in neighboring Sinaloa and Chihuaha — and somewhat within Sonora, too — is significant drug production, including opium poppies, marijuana and meth. To the north, the border is more porous than in other places and far more desolate.

Across the border from Sonoyta is Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, 330,000 acres of public land, and further east is the Tohono O'Odham Nation, a reservation about the size of Connecticut.

"There's nothing but desert for miles and miles," said the DEA's Curry. "It's, unfortunately, one of our biggest vulnerabilities for drug trafficking."

On the Mexican side, it's all agriculture, cattle ranching and sparsely populated rural communities.

THE DRUG ROUTE

Most drug shipments are believed to arrive in Puerto Peñasco. From there they go east to Agua Prieta, Sonoyta, San Luis Río Colorado, Nogales or are shipped by foot north through the desert, where there is less law enforcement, Stratfor has reported.

The western corridor of the Border Patrol's Tucson Sector has been the busiest for years. More than 60 percent of the marijuana seized in the sector is in this area.

Mexican federal authorities have destroyed and seized thousands of pounds of marijuana and had several major seizures of meth, primarily found inside tractor-trailers headed to Tijuana and Mexicali.

For a drug trafficker, it's almost impossible to avoid Sonora, Reed said, whether it is to bring drugs directly into the United States or to transport them further west to Baja California.

"Drugs and people are transported from Mexico to the United States while weapons and money come from the United States to Mexico," said Sonora State Attorney Carlos Navarro Sugich, who oversees the state's investigative police.

The complexities of the area make it essentially a paradise for the cartels, Sugich said. But the violence in Sonoyta is not representative of what's happening in the rest of the state.

Sonoyta has seen more than twice as many homicides this year compared to last — 38 so far in 2015 versus 16 for the same period in 2014, he said. The state's overall number of homicides fell during the same period, from 275 to 200.

The three levels of government are working together to bring peace back to the region. Sonoyta has only about 20 police officers, but with all levels of government included, more than 100 law enforcement personnel patrol the area.

"I don't care if the criminal groups get along or not," Navarro said. "No one has a reason to be killing each other."

At the shooting scenes, officials have found AK-47s and AR-15 rifles, shotguns and ammunition. Some of the dead were found wearing camouflage clothing and tactical vests. Those identified have been from Sonora and from neighboring states including Sinaloa and Chihuahua.

LIFE GOES ON

One day in May, a fight broke out, and Cortez, the mother of three, told her kids to get on the floor. They grabbed at her legs and pleaded with her to lie down with them, but she kept watch.
"Don't get up," she demanded as she peeked through the bedroom window. "I have to make sure they're not coming this way."

As soon as the fighting was over, she grabbed a change of clothes for each child and fled to her sister's home in Sonoyta.

She was there for almost two weeks. She didn't want to overstay her welcome, she said, but she doesn't want to live in Desierto de Sonora anymore.
If she has to leave the house and can't take the children with her, she tells them to lock themselves in and not open the door to anyone.

Her son Joel, 13, said only a handful of children have gone back to school. Many fled to other cities, even other states.
Joel likes his home, he said, but only when bad things don't happen. He knows sicarios, people who kill each other, are in the area.
"There was a killing over there, and over there," he says pointing to different locations.
His mother is still afraid.
"Every little sound wakes me up at night," she said.

Juan Ortega, 65, was at home when shooting broke out on his street.
He and his wife, María Hernández, ran inside and hid under their bed, he said.
The bullets sounded like hail hitting the tin roof.

The couple worked in the nearby cotton and asparagus fields until they could no longer do so because of their age. Now they run a small snack stand outside their home, where neighborhood children go for their daily treat of potato chips, juices and Mexican candy.

The day of the shootout, they packed a suitcase, grabbed their pit bull, Rocky, and headed to Sonoyta, where they stayed a few days with a relative.
"We were last ones to leave and first ones to come back." Ortega said.

Desierto de Sonora has been their home for 42 years.
"We didn't want to leave our little house," he said. "This is all we have."

VIOLENCE COMES HOME

Desierto de Sonora is an ejido — communal land owned by the people. Many came decades ago from other states to work in the fields and never left. They had children and their children had children. With about 200 houses, it is home to 1,200 people.

This is a place where people look out for each other. It's a place where kids can roam free.
"If someone gets sick, everyone pitches in to help," said Dionisia Gutierrez, who has lived here for 22 years.

But even though the gunbattles have stopped and people return home, violence so close to home has taken a major toll on residents' financial and emotional well-being.

"For sale" signs and boarded-up homes dot the landscape.

Antonio Huitrón had been coming from Puerto Peñasco to sell his seafood and seasonal fruit for 15 years. He stopped his weekly trips through town while the violence was at its peak. Now he drives through twice a week, using a portable loudspeaker affixed to the top of his truck to advertise his offerings: fish filets, watermelon and sweet oranges for sale. There are still some areas further east where he won't go.

After the violence last month, Gutierrez, 32, gave several interviews to Mexican television outlets. She showed reporters the broken windows and the more than 20 bullet holes in her pantry and in her children's room. She wondered aloud what would have happened if they had been at home.

When interviewed last week, though, she said everything was fine and she never wanted to leave in the first place. She did it for her kids, ages 8 to 16.

Another resident was with her husband at their snack stand when the shooting started and had to hide in a small metal closet in their backyard, a neighbor said. But when asked by the Star, the woman said she hadn't been there. She didn't see anything.

Her first name? She hesitated. "Rosa."
Last name?
"Can we leave it like that?" she asked. "I don't want trouble."

end

State Department travel advisory
Sonora is a key region in the international drug and human trafficking trades and can be extremely dangerous for travelers. Travelers throughout Sonora are encouraged to limit travel to main roads during daylight hours. The region west of Nogales, east of Sonoyta, and from Caborca north, including the towns of Saric, Tubutama, and Altar, and the eastern edge of Sonora bordering Chihuahua, are known centers of illegal activity, and non-essential travel between these cities should be avoided. Travelers should also defer non-essential travel to the eastern edge of the state of Sonora, which borders the state of Chihuahua (all points along that border east of the northern city of Agua Prieta and the southern town of Alamos), and defer non-essential travel within the city of Ciudad Obregon and south of the city of Navojoa. U.S. citizens visiting Puerto Peñasco should use the Lukeville, Arizona/Sonoyta, Sonora border crossing, and limit driving to daylight hours.





Friday, May 1, 2015

AZMEX SPECIAL 1-5-15

AZMEX SPECIAL 1 MAY 2015

Note: Mostly of local concern or interest.

Experts discuss dengue fever fears amid mosquito discoveries
Posted: Tuesday, April 28, 2015 7:23 pm | Updated: 7:24 pm, Tue Apr 28, 2015.
By Blake Herzog, @BlakeHerzog

http://www.yumasun.com/news/experts-discuss-dengue-fever-fears-amid-mosquito-discoveries/article_be75b49a-ee16-11e4-ba49-e37a86b22cb4.html

About 60 pest and disease control experts from around the state met at the Yuma County Main Library Tuesday for a workshop covering numerous vector control topics, but paying particular attention to aedes aegypti, the species of mosquito which carries dengue fever from human to human.
"This is a human mosquito, it enjoys being around humans, it does well among humans. It's just as happy breeding indoors as outdoors," said Richard Cuming, a vector control specialist with the Yuma County Public Health Services District.

This species was only rediscovered in Yuma County last year after being absent since the 1950s, but its presence in Maricopa County has been growing sine it was first detected in 2001, and dengue itself is spreading throughout the Mexican state of Sonora, across the border from the county.

Joey Martinez, a Yuma County vector control specialist with the environmental health division, said Tuesday officials have been finding the aedes aegypti insect in traps located in the San Luis, Ariz., area, but have not been compiling the numbers yet.

Seventy-one cases of dengue fever, none of which were acquired within Yuma County, were reported here in 2014, Cuming said.

More than 4,000 cases were reported in Sonora throughout 2014, but the disease is mostly found in tropical areas of the world, so its appearance in the desert city of San Luis Rio Colorado, Son., was considered unusual. One dengue-related death was reported in November from that city, among about 60 cases total during 2014.

No cases of dengue fever or a similar virus, chikungunya, which is spread by the same species have been reported so far this year in the county, Cuming said. The season for West Nile virus monitoring has not begun yet, he added.

The health department's planned dengue fever education efforts this year includes flyers handed out door-to-door at homes located near mosquito traps where aedes aegypti is found, he said.
Cuming said this disease differs from the more familiar West Nile virus because mosquitoes transmit it directly between people, instead of picking it up from birds and then spreading it to humans through their bites.

This changes the precautions people must take if they are infected with dengue, as well as what residents should do in order to keep these mosquitoes from breeding on their property.
Patients with dengue fever are advised to avoid getting bitten by mosquitoes at all costs, as well as family members or others in the household, Kirk Smith, supervisor of the Maricopa County Vector Control Division, told attendees at the conference. Aedes aegypti bugs usually bite people on their ankles or calves, he said.
And because aedus aegypti can thrive indoors, people need to pay attention to standing bodies of water inside their homes, emptying and washing pet water dishes, flower vases, bottles, buckets and other containers inside at least once a week.

People should also follow guidelines already used for stopping the spread of the culex mosquitoes which spread West Nile, such as throwing away or turning over anything outside which can collect water including trash cans, tires, flower pots and buckets. Over-watered lawns, irrigation buckets and drywells need to be watched as well.

The dengue fever virus causes no symptoms in many people and flulike symptoms including joint pain and fever in others, but in rare cases leads to dengue hemorrhagic fever, which can be fatal if proper treatment is not received in time.
Warning signs for complications from dengue usually develop three to seven days into the illness and include drop in temperature, severe abdominal pain or vomiting, red spots or patches on skin, bleeding from nose or gums, and blood in vomit or stools.

Professionals from vector control agencies in about half the counties in Arizona were at the conference, including most from the southern half of the state, to compare notes on the spread of the aedes aegypti and efforts to combat it.

Kacey Ernst, an assistant professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of Arizona, spoke about research on the species being done on both sides of the border about the spread of dengue and people's response to the threat.

She said transmission of the disease has been rare in the upper reaches of Sonora, with a handful of local cases reported last year in the Mexican city of Nogales. "Barring last year where we did have a couple of cases, there's generally no local transmission north of Hermosillo," which is about 250 miles south of Tucson, she said.

Likely as a result of the prevalence, Mexican residents studied are more likely to be taking precautions to avoid being bitten or allowing the mosquitoes to breed, she said.

"While repellent is recorded slightly less in Hermosillo than in Tucson, overwhelmingly for all of the other strategies people are reporting doing them more consistently in Hermosillo, so draining stagnant water, clearing the yard of rubbish or containers that might be exploited by aedes aegypti, spraying insecticide, staying indoors, fixing screens," she said.

Despite the amount of research that's been done on this species, experts in Arizona have much to learn about the species spreading dengue, especially how to track it, Smith of Maricopa County said.
"The fact we're picking up huge numbers of aedus aegypti in a trap which was never designed for that species is quite worrisome for us," he said, saying up to 500 males have been found in a trap at a time.

END